Posted by Angelo Delos Trinos @AD3
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Angelo Delos Trinos

Next year, the long-running #ResidentEvil movie franchise will come to a close with the release of its sixth entry, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter. The Resident Evil movies have followed Alice (Milla Jovovich) in her fight against the nefarious Umbrella Corporation and its legions of undead monsters. As tough as the monsters are, the biggest hurdle for both Alice and #ResidentEvil as a whole is the number of unanswered questions the series left in its wake.

With the Resident Evil grand finale just months away, here are some glaring plot holes Resident Evil: The Final Chapter will hopefully fill in.

Why are the Las Plagas and Majini present?

A Las Plagas infected in 'Afterlife'
A Las Plagas infected in 'Afterlife'

The Las Plagas and Majini from #ResidentEvil4 and 5 made cinematic debuts in Resident Evil: Afterlife and Retribution. Doing so, however, contradicts the already shaky cinematic lore of the T-Virus. It's made clear in the games that the Las Plagas, a parasite, is different from the T-Virus, a man-made biochemical weapon. In the movies, the differences between the two infections are never defined.

In the games, the T-Virus turns victims into mindless zombies, while Las Plagas creates brutes with basic intelligence. The movies' T-Virus infected show all of these traits, without any explanation as to how the mindless zombies learned how to use firearms in Retribution, but regressed back to animalistic tendencies in The Final Chapter. Meanwhile, the T-Virus gave Alice psychic powers while the anti-virus turned Doctor Isaacs (Iain Glen) into the Tyrant. Hopefully, The Final Chapter clarifies the viruses' exact power levels while drawing the line between the two viruses.

Why is Alice so powerful and important?

She can do pretty much anything and everything
She can do pretty much anything and everything

As the only person to perfectly bond with the T-Virus and essentially became a superhero as a result, Alice is a valuable asset that the Umbrella Corporation needs to secure at all costs. Yet despite knowing that Alice would most probably kill every last employee under Umbrella before helping them, Umbrella continually wastes resources and manpower failing to capture Alice rather than trying to find an alternative.

Aside from giving the half-assed excuse that Alice is somehow immune to the T-Virus, the Resident Evil series never bothered to give a proper origin and explanation for Alice's powers and clarify what her relevance in Umbrella's plans is. The Final Chapter should provide a decent explanation for Alice's near messianic status and how exactly she impacts the plot as a whole. Hopefully, it's more than the fact that Alice is played by the wife of Resident Evil's main director, Paul W.S. Anderson.

What does Albert Wesker really want?

 Aside from throwing his shades, that is
Aside from throwing his shades, that is

When it comes to double crossing, Albert Wesker comes out as one of the act's most famous practitioners. The thing about double crossing is that there's a motive behind it, something Wesker lacks in his movie appearances. Case in point, he forms an alliance with Alice at the end of Resident Evil: Retribution, but promptly breaks it in The Final Chapter.

Wesker was a mastermind in the Resident Evil games, but the movies did a poor job of depicting his defining trait. Instead of being a manipulative schemer, Wesker in the movies was the smug yet confused head of Umbrella who never planned anything beforehand. One minute he wants to wipe out humanity with the T-Virus, and the next he wants Alice to aid him in saving the world from the undead. Now that his supposed rivalry with Alice is ending in The Final Chapter, Wesker's true goals and motivations should be revealed so that the loosely connected apocalyptic events of the previous films can make sense.

What is the Umbrella Corporation's endgame?

This doesn't make sense in context
This doesn't make sense in context

Despite being the Resident Evil movies' primary antagonist, Umbrella's motivations are pretty pointless. Harnessing the T-Virus for retail/military purposes is useless since the world and any potential buyers died before the events of Extinction. Trying to control it is futile, as seen in Umbrella's attempts to capture Alice. As for finding a cure, Umbrella already made both an anti-virus and an antidote, implying that the corporation is only withholding them because they just don't feel like helping people.

In the end, Umbrella's obvious acts of evil such as killing or capturing survivors are as useful as holding a shareholder meeting in the apocalypse - something Umbrella loves to do in the Resident Evil movies. The Final Chapter needs to be the payoff that neatly ties up all of Umbrella's scattered motives and actions, instead of leaving more hanging threads or rushing the ending to make way for the eventual Resident Evil reboot.

The 'Resident Evil' movies
The 'Resident Evil' movies

The Resident Evil movies are plagued by countless continuity errors, among other problems, and it's a pity the filmmakers never tried to fix these issues. Now that the longest running film series based on a video game is coming to an end, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter has the chance to redeem its franchise by tying up loose ends and wrapping up Alice's story once and for all. Given the reputation of the Resident Evil series, however, audiences should only expect so much.

Check out the latest trailer for Resident Evil: The Final Chapter below:

What other lingering questions do you have about the 'Resident Evil' movies?