Posted by Katie Granger @katgrngr
MP Staff Writer, come to bargain.
Katie Granger

And so it has come to pass. After months of uncertainty regarding the future of #Marvel's Inhumans property, we finally have an official answer. The #Inhumans are joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe — but not as part of the cinematic universe.

The Inhumans movie was initially set to appear in 2019 as part of the #MCU, opening up a whole new side of the narrative universe and giving us even more characters to play with. But the movie was pulled from the release schedule earlier this year, and last we heard there was no script in the works.

(The Inhumans, Marvel Comics)
(The Inhumans, Marvel Comics)

But fear not! As now confirmed by ABC, the Inhumans are coming our way in the form of a TV series — Marvel's The Inhumans. The show will join Agent Carter, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the upcoming Damage Control and Cloak and Dagger as part of the ABC roster, while Netflix props up the rest of the Marvel TV Universe with the various #Defenders shows.

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Is This The Right Move?

Well, probably. Having the Inhumans appear as part of the Marvel TV universe does actually make more than sense than having them join the MCU, or at least it does at this point. When the movie seemed to be struggling to get off the ground, a popular theory was that Inhumans had been sunk somewhat by the using of their plot devices in the Marvel TV shows.

We've seen this happen in the shared universe before over at #DC— with Arrow's Suicide Squad subplot and characters being cut from the TV show to make way for the Warner Bros. DC Extended Universe property of the same name. In the case of the MCU though, the fault seemed to lie with Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., the series jumping the gun by already introducing an Inhumans storyline weaving throughout Season 3.

The existence of the altered humans became the driving force of the show, bringing the Kree back to the forefront after the MCU's flirtation with the alien race in Guardians of the Galaxy. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. also introduced the concept of Terrigenesis to the wider MCU, something that has been massively important for the Inhumans and the X-Men in Marvel Comics as of late.

Inhumans May Be Better Suited To TV

Daisy Johnson / Skye is the Inhuman Quake (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Marvel/ABC)
Daisy Johnson / Skye is the Inhuman Quake (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Marvel/ABC)

As a superhero team, the Inhumans are also probably better suited to be explored in the format of television. While we all love the Avengers team of the MCU movies, the restrictive format of cinema means that we don't get that much character development when it comes to the team itself.

It's taken nearly a decade to establish the major players in the MCU, and interaction between different team members changes depending on who is writing and directing which movie. You only need to look at the difference in Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) across Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Age of Ultron to see that.

Looking at you Joss Whedon (Marvel Studios)
Looking at you Joss Whedon (Marvel Studios)

We believe in the Avengers as individuals who sometimes work together, but because cinema is so expensive and time-consuming to produce, there's never enough time and space to give over to developing strong relationship bonds between them. This is where the format of TV wins out, and this is why it's perfect for the Inhumans.

Because the Inhumans, though they do fall into the definition of a superhero team, are first and foremost a family. A Royal Family. Like the X-Men, they are rejected by the outside world and form their own society — Attilan.

Traditionally they've adhered to a familial structure within that society, led by their King Black Bolt and Queen Medusa, though that has changed up over the years — especially as of late with Marvel's ongoing Civil War II. There's also lots of family drama to play with, like Medusa's relationship with Johnny Storm — her sister's ex-husband.

(Uncanny Inhumans, Marvel Studios)
(Uncanny Inhumans, Marvel Studios)

What Does This Mean For The MCU?

A real family of superheroes is something that is sorely missing from the MCU right now, as we ramp up to the Defenders and the Avengers fall apart in the wake of Captain America: Civil War. Avengers: Infinity War is going to draw a huge amount of characters from the movies together, but largely as disconnected individuals who have to come together to combat a greater force.

This guy (Marvel Studios)
This guy (Marvel Studios)

One of the most fascinating aspects of Marvel comics is how the various teams work together, both externally and internally, and getting to really explore that properly in relation to the Inhumans could make for a very strong show.

And given that they have not yet appeared in the movies, removing that property from the MCU shouldn't have that much of a ripple effect there. What will be very interesting moving forward will be how The Inhumans intersects and/or clashes with Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and what kind of crossover we'll see between the two.

Sadly — as the divide between the two mediums grows ever larger — the Inhumans may never be part of the cinematic MCU now. But that's maybe a good thing for them as a team, even if it may rob us of the opportunity to see Medusa face off with Robert Downey Jr.'s Tony Stark. One can yet dream.

(Civil War II, Marvel Comics)
(Civil War II, Marvel Comics)

What do you want to see in Marvel's The Inhumans? Sound off in the comments below!