ByKit Simpson Browne, writer at Creators.co
Staff Writer, Superheroes, Star Wars and such. Bad jokes aplenty. Can be gently prodded on Twitter at @kitsb1
Kit Simpson Browne

(WARNING: The following contains an extremely mild plot SPOILER for DC's Suicide Squad. Proceed with whatever level of caution your shadowy government handler suggests to you is wise.)

Now, for fans of #DC's distinctly superpowered crime caper, #SuicideSquad, the prospect of an extended edition has long been a ridiculously exciting one. After all, the idea of getting a solid 15 or so minutes more of a movie you love is almost always always an intriguing proposition, but perhaps doubly so when the film in question was already so tightly packed with classic DC comic book heroes and villains. The suspicion being, of course, that there might just be a handful more hiding in the expanded cut.

And, as it turns out?

The Suicide Squad Extended Edition Is Indeed Hiding A Secret Cameo

[Suicide Squad/Warner Bros]
[Suicide Squad/Warner Bros]

It's just...not quite what you might have been expecting.

Y'see, while it turns out that the extended edition does indeed feature a surprise cameo that didn't make it into the theatrical cut — one that appears during the #KillerCroc feeding scene — it's not from a third tier comic book villain, or an old-school DC-linked actor like Adam West. Instead, it's this guy:

[Suicide Squad/Warner Bros]
[Suicide Squad/Warner Bros]

Namely Suicide Squad's director himself, #DavidAyer. Who, it seems, opted to add himself into the movie in Tarantino-like fashion as a guard, but then opted to show an endearing amount of humility, and cut himself out in order to shave some time off of the final cut.

That, after all, very much seems to have been the fate that befell the scene, with the extended edition adding a little dialogue both before and after the content we saw in the theatrical release. With that removal suggesting that Ayer (and perhaps the folks at #WarnerBros) felt the movie was running a little long, it's notable that the director opted to remove his own appearance, presumably feeling that it would be unfair to cut out others' acting work before his own.

Whether the scene works better with or without Ayer, though, remains very much up to you. The extended edition is, after all, available on Digital HD now.

What do you think, though? Was Ayer right to cut himself out, or would you have liked to see him in the theatrical cut? Let us know below!

[ComicBook.com]