Posted by Allanah Faherty @allanah
Staff Writer and resident Walking Dead expert at MP. Tweet me @bananallanah or email [email protected]
Allanah Faherty

I don't know about you guys, but Episode 6 of #Westworld totally blew me away. Not that the show had become boring or same-y, but there was just something about Episode 6, "The Adversary" that pulled me right back into the park and got me pumped for the remaining four episodes.

We took a total break from #Dolores, William and Logan this week, and instead got a whole bunch of information about how the information about Westworld is getting out of the park (supposedly via Theresa). In addition to that we checked in on Felix and Maeve (who now seems woke af), and finally we got a glimpse into Ford's childhood thanks to his weird family of ghost hosts, made by Arnold.

Robert Ford and... Robert Ford [John P. Johnson/HBO]
Robert Ford and... Robert Ford [John P. Johnson/HBO]

As always with Westworld there was a lot of information to take in, and given that our bulk apperception is probably only dialled up to 14 on our attribute matrix, there's likely a few details from the episode that were missed. Take a look at the five things you might have missed from Westworld, Episode 6 "The Adversary."

1. Someone is definitely waiting for hosts at the center of the maze

Mr Ford spotted this carving in Episode 6 [HBO]
Mr Ford spotted this carving in Episode 6 [HBO]

As with every week the Man in Black continued his mission to find the maze in Episode 6. This week the MiB and Teddy shot up an entire camp of soldiers in order to make tracks, but before that Teddy revealed what he knew about the maze. Teddy told the MiB:

"The maze is an old native myth... The maze itself is the sum of a man's life, the choices he makes, the dreams he hangs onto. And there at the center is a legendary man who has been killed over and over again countless times, but always clawed his way back to life. The man returned for the last time and vanquished all his oppressors in a tireless fury. He built a house and around that house he built a maze so complicated only he could navigate though it - I reckon he'd seen enough of fighting."

Mr Ford looking over old images of the maze [HBO]
Mr Ford looking over old images of the maze [HBO]

Teddy's story was extremely interesting, given that just one scene prior, Mr Ford had dug out an old sketch book containing a drawing of the the maze. This was prompted after he saw a carving of the maze in Pariah. Even though it was Ford looking through the book, I can't help but think that perhaps the sketchbook initially belonged to Arnold, which might make sense in regards to Teddy's story.

If the books were Arnold's and Arnold was the creator of the maze, then Teddy's story implies that either Arnold didn't die and instead chose to shut himself off inside a house in the middle of a maze. Or perhaps that Arnold sealed off the remainder of his life's work in the center of an unsolvable maze, awaiting a worthy challenger to solve it and find it.

2. The ol' dual-timeline theory rears its head again

Felix walks past the new logo in Episode 6 [HBO]
Felix walks past the new logo in Episode 6 [HBO]

If you're a Westworld fan who loves a crazy theory, there's no doubt you've heard all about the possibility that the show is taking place over two timelines. Many fans believe that William and Logan's storyline has happened at some point in the past and that we're seeing their story in flashbacks. Meaning that at some point William will have a significant impact on the story and Westworld itself. The main evidence for theory is that William and Logan were greeted by the old Westworld logo when they arrived, and also by Clementine and another madam that was not Maeve, implying that at this time Maeve was assigned to a different loop.

The logo William was greeted with in Episode 2 [HBO]
The logo William was greeted with in Episode 2 [HBO]

But for any who don't believe the two-storyline theory, or dismissed it as a small detail, there was some evidence in Episode 6 that makes it really hard to disregard. First up, Bernard needed to use the old computer system to get information about the woodcutter who Elsie and Stubbs were chasing back in Episode 3. When he fired up the old system way down in the abandoned B82 level, the old logo flashed up on screen.

The old Westworld logo on the screen of an old computer system [HBO]
The old Westworld logo on the screen of an old computer system [HBO]

The use of the old logo could have just been dismissed as an anomaly, however a few scenes later we see Felix and Maeve walk passed a huge version of the new logo, very obviously pointing out the difference. Then moments later, after Maeve sees footage of herself with her daughter in a former narrative, Felix reveals to Maeve that she's only been the madam at the Mariposa for around a year - explaining why, if Logan and William visited the park some time ago, Maeve wasn't waiting with Clementine outside the bar. Convinced by the dual timeline yet? I got to say, I think I am.

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3. Ford's father and Arnold are the same man?

Ford's father-host before he attempts to bash Bernard [HBO]
Ford's father-host before he attempts to bash Bernard [HBO]

After meeting Ford's little spy boy a few times over the last three episodes the big theory was that he was actually a child-host version the park creator himself. Well, that was ultimately proven correct when we finally learned where exactly the boy lived in Episode 6. As it turned out, the boy and his three family members were actually first generation hosts created to look like Ford and his family on holiday in a cottage in Cornwall.

Ford described the family as a gift from Arnold, though the whole concept/idea of Arnold has become a little more confusing after Ford claimed that the man in the cottage was a recreation of his father, despite earlier showing Bernard a picture of the same man and implying that it was Arnold.

The supposed picture of Ford and Arnold [HBO]
The supposed picture of Ford and Arnold [HBO]

Ford's father's reaction to being called Arnold by Bernard clearly indicates that that was not his name so now the big question is: If that man in the photograph is not Arnold, who is Arnold?

It could turn out that Arnold is Ford's brother whose name we are yet to learn, however if that were the case then Ford's father surely would have reacted in a different manner. Another big theory circulating the internet is that Arnold is Bernard, or rather Bernard is a host that was created in Arnold's image. This would explain why Ford didn't show him a picture of the real Arnold - that could lead to unnecessary confusion. It would also go aways to explain why Bernard or people around him are constantly referring to the fact that Bernard has been working at the park for an eternity. And lastly, now that we've seen Ford's ghostly host family, it proves that there is precedent for this kind of thing - why wouldn't Ford want to bring his old friend back to life?

4. There were references to Medieval and Roman Worlds

Elsie was off on a solo mission in Episode 4 in order to find the relay that had been switched on by a mysterious person smuggling data out of the park. She figured that the relay (which the person had been using to talk to hosts) was located inside an old theater in Sector 3 and once inside there were a number of props that seemed like they must be a clever nod to the original 1973 Westworld film.

Along with West World, the original film also contained Medieval World and Roman World, and in the theater that Elsie visited to find the relay contained props that seemed a very deliberate nod to TV series source material. As she walked in there was a marble statue, like something one would expect to see in Roman World, a jesters mask, rocking horse and suit of armor that would all be things that would surely appear in Medieval World. While normally I would take these references with a hearty pinch of salt, given that there was also a pretty cool nod to Yul Brynner a.k.a the Gunslinger in Episode 6, it seems obviously the props in the theater were very deliberately chosen.

5. There was a cool Dungeons and Dragons easter egg

Maeve's attribute matrix [HBO]
Maeve's attribute matrix [HBO]

With all the talk of Maeve's attributes matrix it seem like Episode 6 was primed for a subtle easter egg for Dungeons and Dragons fans, and Westworld didn't let us nerds down.

When Felix and Sylvester introduced Maeve to the attribute matrix, they explain all the different attributes that she has which exist on a scale of 1 - 20 (much like the main rolling dice in D&D). Felix explains how the numbers work, and then Sylvester points out that Maeve has 18 for charm. This was a great little call out for D&D fans who will know that 18 is the highest natural limit for any ability score that a character can have (with the exception of race or class modifiers). Being a successful madam, there's no doubt that if Maeve was a character in D&D her natural charisma score would be high - however as any role play gamer knows, in the end it's all up to the roll of the dice.

Westworld returns to HBO with Episode 7, "Trump L'Oeil" on Sunday, November 13.

What did you think of Episode 6, "The Adversary"