ByAllanah Faherty, writer at Creators.co
Staff Writer and resident Walking Dead expert at MP. Tweet me @bananallanah or email [email protected]
Allanah Faherty

With all the twists and turns in #HBO's #Westworld, the series has thrown up more questions than answers, and as the season inches closer to an end, one of the big uncertainties is what exactly Ford's new narrative entails.

With the board executives unhappy with Ford's decision to go rogue and build a narrative of his own creation, we can be sure that the story will be nothing like what we've seen so far in the park. But what details have already been revealed about the upcoming plot and what are the top theories?

Take a look below where we outline everything we know so far, including that insane theory that Ford's villain might be someone already very familiar to us.

The narrative's location

Ford's narrative will sit in the unclaimed territories [Discover Westworld]
Ford's narrative will sit in the unclaimed territories [Discover Westworld]

We first learned Ford was planning a narrative of his own back in Episode 2, when the eccentric park owner told Mr Sizemore that the guests visited Westworld "because they want a glimpse of who they could be," and promised that his storyline was something he had "been working on for some time", and was "something quite original."

The Agave plantation is demolished in Ep 4 [HBO]
The Agave plantation is demolished in Ep 4 [HBO]

During Episode 4, Ford proved that his narrative was indeed going to be something original when he started construction on a massive canyon, bulldozing the Agave plantation (which had been part of Westworld for most, if not all, of the park's existence) to make room. This confirmed that Ford's narrative would be taking place in the unclaimed territories area of the park, and that the canyon would stop short before the town of Las Mudas.

The same church spire Ford saw versus the spire in Dolores flashback [HBO]
The same church spire Ford saw versus the spire in Dolores flashback [HBO]

Also there's the mystery of the buried township which we saw Ford look over in Episode 2. The church spire has also subsequently popped up in both Dolores and Teddy's flashbacks, and it seems likely that this buried town is where Arnold was killed before the park opened. Why now has Ford ordered the town that he once buried (in what looks like some sort of literal cover up of the Arnold incident) to be uncovered for his new narrative?

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What does the narrative involve?

The native American hosts walk through Sweetwater in Ep 4 [HBO]
The native American hosts walk through Sweetwater in Ep 4 [HBO]

In Episode 8, Charlotte and Lee Sizemore were discussing Ford's narrative, when Charlotte dropped this knowledge about it:

"He's already almost finished with it. He dug up some old town on the fringes of the park, created a horde of masked men to terrorize guests and proselytize-cum-advertise the coming of some end-all villain named Wyatt."

Of course, we've heard of Wyatt before — he's Teddy's ultimate adversary, seen only once in flashbacks in Episode 3, but actually Episode 8 also hinted at something quite different: Dolores is Wyatt.

Dolores remembering the town in Episode 8 [HBO]
Dolores remembering the town in Episode 8 [HBO]

This conclusion was reached when we saw Dolores' flashback in Episode 8 which perfectly mirrored Teddy's flashback of Wyatt. Redditor NoMereVeneerofVanity explains:

Teddy’s Wyatt flashback mirrors Dolores’ almost perfectly. We know that when hosts “relive” violent memories, they act them out (like when Maeve slashes Clementine 2.0’s throat remembering MiB), establishing that Dolores really did shoot a bunch of hosts and then put her gun to her head, as she does this in the present.

Teddy recalls Wyatt in Episode 3 [HBO]
Teddy recalls Wyatt in Episode 3 [HBO]

This would be extremely poetic and in-line with Teddy's tragic storyline. Given that Teddy needs to defeat Wyatt before he can be with Dolores, it'd be the cruelest twist to learn that his beloved was also his nemesis as Redditor ProperNorthernDrink wrote:

While I was also considering that Dolores was in fact Wyatt, it made me think of how Teddy, who is born to lose, is stuck with having to defeat Wyatt in order to end up with Dolores. He will never be happy.

Teddy and Dolores (or Wyatt/) [John P. Johnson/HBO]
Teddy and Dolores (or Wyatt/) [John P. Johnson/HBO]

Further evidence to support the theory that Dolores is the new villain is all of the private conversations that Ford has been having with Dolores — are his discussions with Dolores actually him preparing his new villain in his narrative? And given that Teddy and the Man in Black just came up against some strange masked men in Episode 8, is Ford's narrative already live?

But hold onto your (black or white) hats, because there's a whole other branch to this gnarled up tree of theories which could reveal the true direction of Ford's narrative. Remember how Mr. Sizemore believed Ford had tasked him with creating Wyatt, and then Charlotte counters that Ford is merely tasking him with chores so he doesn't interrupt the real work on the narrative? Well, what if that is what Ford is doing with everyone.

The real narrative?

Two sides to Ford and two sides to his narrative? [John P. Johnson/HBO]
Two sides to Ford and two sides to his narrative? [John P. Johnson/HBO]

Busy theorists all over the net have dreamt up a rather different idea who Ford's narrative is for, one that could actually be just crazy enough to work. Instead of Ford creating some imaginative story for guests to enjoy, perhaps the new narrative is for the hosts, and the aim is to spark off consciousness.

In the very first episode of Westworld we learn that Ford has written a new piece of code allowing a whole new class of gestures called 'reveries' in the hosts. The reveries all the hosts to recall some past experience to help them learn and humanize their behavior. Later we learn that the code that allows reveries has been interfering with the hosts and causing malfunctions, and although Ford passes it off as a mistake, could it have really been intentional?

Elsie and Bernard observe Clementine's new gesture [HBO]
Elsie and Bernard observe Clementine's new gesture [HBO]

And if the reveries were no mistake, what if Ford's real intention is for the hosts to become conscious so the park has another critical fail? Given Ford's disdain for the controlling board of the park it would make sense he would want to screw them over - especially if he knows that they have nefarious intentions for his life's work. If Ford awakens consciousness in the hosts and the result is the park imploding on itself, his problem could be solved. Not to mention that given that he's an older gentleman, this destructive narrative could be his final hurrah before riding off into the white light.

We've written him off as a villain, but what if Ford truly has the best interests of the world at heart? Perhaps Ford is the Snape of this whole tale after all.

Westworld returns to HBO with Episode 9 on Sunday, November 27.

What are your theories on Ford's narrative?

Cutting Sizemore down to size, some more... [HBO]
Cutting Sizemore down to size, some more... [HBO]