ByHawkins DuBois, writer at Creators.co
I'm definitely not two children stacked on top of each other wearing a trench coat, and I'm definitely not on twitter @Hawk_Eye_19
Hawkins DuBois

For the majority of filmgoers, the #DCEU has been an absolute failure up until this point. Financially, #ManOfSteel, #BatmanVSuperman, and #SuicideSquad did fine, but with a combined Rotten Tomatoes score that barely eclipses 100, it's clear that fans aren't happy with how these films have turned out thus far.

But in 2017, the desolate cloud that hangs over the DCEU might be swept away with the arrival of #WonderWoman. The first trailer dropped at #ComicCon several months ago, and since then the hype for the movie has only grown. Given the newest peek at #WarnerBros' upcoming film, the movie looks stunning:

I don't just mean that the movie seems like it's going to be fantastic though, I mean that it literally looks stunning. The production design and cinematography are absolutely gorgeous, and that aspect could be key to unlocking a critically acclaimed DCEU movie.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer

When people compare the DCEU to the #MCU, one of the easiest differences to spot is the tone of the movies. Marvel presents a fairly upbeat world — one filled with people who just want to do the right thing and help those around them. Whereas, DC presents a more bleak outlook on life — a world where people tend to focus on seeing the evil in others, and where people are just out for themselves. Neither one of those views has to be right or wrong, nor does one point of view necessarily make an inherently better movie, but DC's dark tone has led to a repressed color palette that makes their movies less visually interesting. It seems clear that #PattyJenkins and company have taken notice of that misstep though, and have looked to rectify that issue with Wonder Woman. Jenkins's film looks to stay closer to the look of the source material, capturing the sort of visually-pleasing pigments that draw the viewer's eyes.

The trailer wastes no time in using color to catch viewer's eyes. It opens in present day, showing Diana Prince looking at an old photo and remembering what her life was once like. A seemingly innocuous shot depicts Diana holding the photo, but in the most subtle of ways, the trailer is already telling us that this movie is going to look different than previous entries into the DCEU. In the shots of Diana arriving at her destination and looking at the photo, she is wearing bright red. In a world that is doused in darkness, for once the DCEU is providing a beam of brightness. A segment of color to catch our eyes, and to not force viewers to look into a constantly depressed visual scheme.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer

Less than 10 seconds into this trailer, and already it's easy to see how Wonder Woman is going to break away from the visual style of Zack Snyder, and that change couldn't be more welcome.

In Man of Steel, the movie's prologue drops us straight into the world of Krypton, but the way Snyder presents Krypton looks wildly different from how Jenkins is going to be presenting Themyscira. Krypton was dark and drab, filled with little color of any kind, but with Themyscira, we see a world with a golden hue, lush green forests, and a sparkling blue sea.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer and 'Man of Steel'
'Wonder Woman' Trailer and 'Man of Steel'

As the trailer progresses, we're teased with plenty of moments from the sort of action sequences we'll be treated to. Working behind the camera is cinematographer Matthew Jensen, a veteran of several episodes of #GameOfThrones and #RayDonovan, and a man who appears to have beautifully captured numerous wartime moments and Snyder-inspired slo-mo action shots. While the overall look of the World War I-set movie looks to maintain the dark tone of the DCEU, the sparks of light and bright remain present throughout to give Wonder Woman a more exciting feel.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer

Even in a scene such as the one where Diana and #ChrisPine's Steve Trevor get attacked in an alley, there aren't any reds, golds or greens, but the brightened-blue color palette and shot design still make for a far more enthralling sequence than it would if everything was illustrated in hues of darkness.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer

In both of Man of Steel and Batman v Superman, some of the most powerful shots revolved around Superman being the central focus, in costume, in the heart of the shot. That idea carries over into Wonder Woman, but it extends beyond just the shots of her in costume. Throughout the trailer, we get several opportunities to focus on Diana as the focus of an integral shot, and every time Gal Gadot shines, thanks to the various members of the visual team.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer

The entirety of this second Wonder Woman trailer manages to create a look that feels at home with the rest of the DCEU but also serves to greatly improve upon what the previous movies had been missing: a color code that stayed honest to the source material, while also proving magnetic for viewer's eyes. The work of Patty Jenkins, Matthew Jensen, production designer Aline Bonetto, costume designer Lindy Hemming, and the rest of the visual team should not go unnoticed on this film. Wonder Woman looks like it's going to be an incredible movie, and the restructured presentation looks to be a huge reason why.

'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer
'Wonder Woman' Trailer

What did you think of this newest Wonder Woman trailer? Were you impressed with the different visual style that Patty Jenkins has taken? Did you notice a different look at all? Let us know how you feel about the trailer and the look in the comments!