ByBen Tobin Johnson, writer at Creators.co
I memorized Jurassic Park and wrote a book about it.
Ben Tobin Johnson

I know, I know. You’re three seasons deep in ten different shows with dozens of seasons left to go in each; the last thing you need is more Netflix-induced option paralysis.

Hear me out. Do you like food? Do you like interesting people? Do you like HD footage of beautiful things like this?

Pictured: beautiful things.
Pictured: beautiful things.

And what if I told you that all of that is available for the low, low price of six episodes per season?

Welcome to Chef’s Table.

Massimo Bottura and the Parmigiano of Destiny
Massimo Bottura and the Parmigiano of Destiny

Each episode features a chef, a food critic who contextualizes their place in the culinary arts (and culture at large), and stunning cinematography of their work at all stages from kitchen to table.

But Chef’s Table is as much about unique food as the eccentric visionaries behind it.

You’ll meet people like Grant Achatz, whose approach to food deliberately toys with your every expectation. Can you eat a balloon made out of sugar, for example? The chefs at Grant’s restaurant, Alinea, would like to vote yes – and they also recommend the “Truffle Explosion.”

Comes with a side of helium-induced chipmunk voice
Comes with a side of helium-induced chipmunk voice

Grant’s culinary brilliance is further underscored when you learn that, as a result of tongue cancer, he continued pursuing his passion without a sense of taste.

Then there’s Dominique Crenn, the first female chef to be awarded two Michelin stars. You’d probably guess she had to go through all sorts of expensive formal training to achieve that kind of acclaim, right? You’d guess wrong. Her only schooling was amidst the kitchens she worked in before opening her own restaurant.

Chef Dominique Crenn resurrects another memory
Chef Dominique Crenn resurrects another memory

And if you visit her San Francisco restaurant Atelier Crenn, you will not be presented with a traditional menu. Instead, you receive a poem, the lines of which refer to the various courses and dishes in your meal – each one a memory, a place, a story from Crenn’s childhood transcribed into the sensual language of sustenance.

These are only two examples, and odds are you already stopped reading this to go watch this literal feast right now.

Chef Dan Barber and staff at Blue Hill Farm
Chef Dan Barber and staff at Blue Hill Farm

For those of you who remain, I understand you’re weary of What-To-Watch posts because you already know what to watch: another episode of that show you’ve been putting off. But at six episodes per season (and only two seasons on Netflix as of this writing), Chef’s Table is the perfect break from your regularly scheduled programming.

P.S. You’re going to want your favorite food(s) handy for this one.