ByElise Jost, writer at Creators.co
"It's a UNIX system! I know this!"
Elise Jost

Warning: Game of Thrones spoilers ahead, obviously.

Has there ever been a relationship more toxic than Jaime and Cersei's on Game of Thrones? The incestuous affair of the Lannister twins has always seemed to bring out the best and the worst in them, ever since Jaime pushed Bran out of a tower window for having caught them in the forbidden act in the very first season of the show.

Now that Season 6 has gone out in a neon green bang, however, we're left wondering if the bond between them could start wavering — just look at Jaime's face when he comes back to King's Landing to find the Great Sept destroyed, along with all of the people inside, including Margaery Tyrell, his last son dead and his sister and lover sitting on the Iron Throne.

This makes even more sense when you consider the prophecy spoken by Maggy the Frog to a young Cersei Lannister, in which she professed that Cersei would wed the king, have three children with golden crowns, and die strangled at the hands of the valonqar, the High Valyrian word for "little brother." Now that the first two parts of the prophecy have come true, we're basically stomping our feet for the last act to happen — but who will carry out the deed? It could be anyone's little brother, but if you narrow it down to Cersei's siblings, both Tyrion and Jaime would fit the description, since Jaime was born a few minutes after his sister. If it turns out to be Jaime whose mission is to stop the new queen, however, does he have it in him to kill his most significant other?

Jaime Would Do Everything For Love

'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

It was clear pretty much right away that Jaime and Cersei's sexy sessions weren't just some kind of mad fling — their incestuous relationship had been going on since childhood and was growing stronger every day. As Kingsguard, Jaime was forbidden from marrying so he stayed faithful to his sister, although she had a few partners that weren't always just strategy.

As Cersei herself said to the face of Ned Stark:

"Jaime and I are more than brother and sister. Came into this world together, we belong together."

Serving as a sort of proof for just how deep Jaime and Cersei had fallen in their infatuation for each other, Jaime pushed 10-year-old Bran Stark out of the window when the poor boy caught them during intercourse on their trip to Winterfell. Far from remorse, the only thing that Jaime would sigh then was:

"The things I do for love!"
'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

And the sentence held its truth, as Jaime would always come back to Cersei and their children, despite her ruthless attitude, her mood swings, and her other lovers. Even when it's clear that he disapproves of Cersei's little schemes, he's there to comfort her and make a few vain attempts at keeping their family together. They fail, but who can blame two motherless children for being so terrible at parenting? When they received a message from Dorne threatening that their daughter Myrcella's life was in danger, he promised to "bring our daughter home," in what we could call his most fatherly declaration yet.

His blinded love took a more disturbing turn, however, when he forced himself upon Cersei right next to the corpse of their eldest son Joffrey. His actions started out as an attempt to comfort her after the death of Joffrey, but his furious passion got the best of him, showing just how toxic their bond can be.

At The End Of The Day, Is Jaime Lannister A Good Guy?

'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

When Jaime Lannister first appeared on Game of Thrones, he was pretty much a villain in the eyes of the viewers and the rest of the characters. His assassination of Mad King Aerys earned him the infamous sobriquet of Kingslayer, but as much as he hated it, he never actually spoke up about why he killed the king he was so loyal to. That is, until he confessed to Brienne that his intentions had been to stop the Mad King from "burning them all."

And there's more to Jaime's encounters with Brienne that reveal some uncomfortable truths, far from the spying walls of King's Landing. Ambiguous or not, it's his first relationship with a grown woman that isn't Cersei, and it's safe to say that of the two, Brienne's the one with her head on her shoulders. Her presence is like a sign of hope that there's more out there than consuming yourself in taboo incest with a woman who seems way too ambitious for her skills.

'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

It also looks like Jaime's various trips to the field helped him get a better grasp on reality than his royal wannabe of a sister, slowly but surely starting to question Cersei's perceptions of what's right and what's wrong. When Jeffrey is poisoned, Cersei immediately points to Tyrion as the culprit, but Jaime insists on several occasions that his brother's involvement is far from proven. Could he be the only Lannister with an actual, if tiny, sense of decency? His loyalty to the king and the fact that he sacrifices his reputation to save the lives of thousands of innocents make this sound not so absurd.

The Prophecy: The Ultimate Act Of Love?

'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

Going back to Maggy's prophecy, there are three possible scenarios for Jamie: Either he's not involved, he snaps after years of Cersei blocking him from bringing out the good guy buried deep within him, or he strangles Cersei as the ultimate act of love when he gets to the point where he truly believes that it's the best possible outcome for both of them.

In an interview with The New York Times, the actor behind Jaime, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, hinted that Season 7 would signify a new dawn in Jaime and Cersei's relationship.

"He once said, 'The things I do for love,' and it was all about protecting his sister and also the kids. Now they're all gone."
'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

Speaking of the look on Jaime's face in the season finale, he acknowledged that the former Kingsguard was terrified of seeing his sister go crazy:

"I think basically he's in shock. So many things are going through his head — you look down and you see your sister telling the rest of the world to go to hell. The woman you love has turned into this seemingly mad woman."

Does Jaime feel like he's already lost Cersei? Ultimately, her unscrupulous trick on the Great Sept of Baelor might lead Jaime to realize that he's left with no other choice than to stop her — just as he stopped the Mad King before.

"The cruel irony is he killed the Mad King in order to save King's Landing, and he comes back to find out his sister pulled the trigger instead."

How beautiful would it be if Jaime kills Cersei with the very golden hand she got forged for him, professing his love while earnestly believing he was doing the right thing?

'Game of Thrones' / HBO
'Game of Thrones' / HBO

What do you think does Season 7 of Game of Thrones hold for Jaime and Cersei?

Source: The New York Times