Posted by Angelo Delos Trinos @AD3
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Angelo Delos Trinos

If you watched a movie in the cinema this month, chances are you saw the trailer for the upcoming thriller adaptation The Girl on the Train. If you haven't, check it out below.

Based on Paula Hawkins' best-selling book of the same name, The Girl on the Train follows Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt) as she gets involved in a missing persons case witnessed while commuting by train. To make matters worse, Rachel discovers that she may have had something to do with the missing person in question.

It may not be intentional, but The Girl on the Train's trailer gave some viewers flashbacks to another missing persons adaptation: Gone Girl, from Fight Club and Se7en director David Fincher. While The Girl on the Train, from The Help director Tate Taylor, will be judged on its own merits, the similarities to Fincher's critically-acclaimed thriller are hard to ignore. Here are five scenes from The Girl on the Train's trailer that may remind you of Gone Girl.

The Girl on the Train (Left) and Gone Girl (Right): The similarities go beyond the missing women's blank stares
The Girl on the Train (Left) and Gone Girl (Right): The similarities go beyond the missing women's blank stares

Warning: Major spoilers for 'Gone Girl' to follow.


The Media Circus

Time: 1:50
Time: 1:50

Gone Girl put emphasis on the media's role in shaping public opinion, for better or worse. No matter what Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) said, the media twisted his words and painted him in a negative light. Needless to say, Gone Girl did not have a flattering depiction of the press.

The Girl on the Train will tell the story behind the mysterious disappearance of Megan Hipwell, played by Haley Bennett, through Rachel's eyes. With her possible involvement in the case, the press is bound to give this angle tons of media mileage. Given the high profile case at the center of The Girl on the Train, the media will play a role in stressing out Rachel and the authorities as they get closer to the truth.

A Murder Most Foul... Or Not

Time: 1:39
Time: 1:39

The biggest twist in Gone Girl was the revelation that Amy Dune (Rosamund Pike) was never in any kind of peril to begin with. In fact, she escaped to another state after planting convincing evidence that implicated her husband Nick in her disappearance. Through means of flashbacks and reenactments, Gone Girl tricked the audience into thinking that Nick was a cold-hearted murderer hiding in plain sight.

The Girl on the Train is not ashamed of this similarity, as it also hopes to mislead viewers into buying one plausible theory before revealing the twisted truth. It is shown in the trailer that no one knows for sure what happened to Megan, but her death has yet to be dismissed as a possibility. Like Gone Girl, there is an emphasis on the violent scenes portraying Megan as the victim but these could be similar acts of misdirection on the part of The Girl on the Train's trailer. If there's anything viewers learned from Gone Girl, it's that a trailer should not be taken at face value.

His Cheating Heart

Time: 0:15-0:18
Time: 0:15-0:18

Amy's reason for framing Nick stems from him cheating on her. This added yet another layer of depth and intrigue to the already complex web of lies in Gone Girl. It also had a hand in convincing audiences that there was nothing else to the characters outside of what was stated as fact in Gone Girl's opening act.

According to the trailer, the victim Megan is actually the nanny of Rachel's ex-husband, Scott Hipwell (Luke Evans). Scott and Megan's relationship was explicitly shown in the trailer's opening seconds, along with the revelation that Rachel is not taking her recent divorce that well. It has yet to be shown if Scott's romance with Megan came before or after the divorce, but what is clear is that Rachel's feelings towards their relationship will play a major role in deciphering the truth behind Megan's sudden disappearance.

A Woman Scorned

Time: 1:23-1:25
Time: 1:23-1:25

No matter what gender or what age you may be, cheating on your significant other is inexcusable. Nick's infidelity is what spurred Amy to turn from being the children's author "Amazing Amy" to the manipulative sociopath who faked rape accusations to get back at a previous cheating lover of hers.

This kind of vengeance may be seen again in The Girl on the Train, where a major plot point and blow to Rachel's alleged innocence is the indirect connection she shares with Megan. Rachel is no fan of Megan's newfound relationship, and this discomfort could have played a role in the latter's vanishing. If she did plan it all beforehand, Rachel's plans to get back at Scott are already halfway realized. Either that or Megan faked the crisis just like Amy did to spite Scott and maybe even Rachel for reasons unknown.

Guilty Until Proven Innocent

Time: 1:53-1:55
Time: 1:53-1:55

For a majority of Gone Girl, Nick desperately tried to convince the public (and by extension, the audience) of his innocence despite evidence to the contrary being relentlessly thrown at him from all sides.

Rachel finds herself in a similar conundrum in The Girl on the Train, where her past with Scott is why the police put her under suspicion in their ongoing investigation on Megan's whereabouts - to the point where they think she murdered Megan. Hell, the trailers for both movies even have similar claims of innocence.

From Gone Girl's trailer:

Nick: I did not kill my wife. I am not a murderer.

From The Girl on the Train's trailer:

Officer Riley: Did you murder Megan Hipwell?
Rachel: No.

Only at Gone Girl's end is it shown that, even if he committed morally questionable acts, Nick is still the victim of Amy's manipulations. Similarly, Rachel's true motivations will be a brutal twist likely saved for The Girl on the Train's final minutes. Expect these revelations to change viewers' first impressions of the cast and everything that was revealed beforehand.

What other similarities to 'Gone Girl' did you see in the trailer for 'The Girl on the Train?'