ByJancy Richardson, writer at Creators.co
To avoid fainting, keep repeating 'It's only a movie...It's only a movie...'
Jancy Richardson

Hacksaw Ridge brought home two Oscar wins (for Best Sound Mixing and Best Film Editing) at the 89th Academy Awards, and while we've seen war movies win big before, is this the goriest picture ever honored by the Academy?

As the love to snub horror movies — The Silence of the Lambs is the only horror movie to have ever won Best Picture — war movies are the surest way for gore to seep into the Academy.

certainly brought the historically-minded carnage...

See also:

1. Hacksaw Ridge

  • Released: 2016
  • Director: Mel Gibson
  • Which War: World War II, The Battle of Okinawa

Conscientious objector Desmond Doss never used a gun, such was his belief in pacifism. Hacksaw Ridge is a film of two halves: the first, a soldier bullied for his Seventh Day Adventist stringency, the second, an all-out, balls-to-the-wall slaughterhouse to rank with Hollywood's greatest screen battles. It's hella gory, and totally gripping.

Dat phat flamethrower in 'Hacksaw Ridge' [Credit: Summit Entertainment]
Dat phat flamethrower in 'Hacksaw Ridge' [Credit: Summit Entertainment]

2. R-Point

  • Released: 2004
  • Director: Kong Su-chang
  • Which War: Vietnam War

This Korean picture about the Vietnam conflict is actually designed to be a horror movie, though its carnage quotient pales in comparison with the geysers of gore in Hacksaw Ridge. A South Korean troupe receive a radio transmission from a missing army unit, only to slowly perish in bizarre and apparently supernatural ways.

Desolation in 'R-Point' [Credit: Cinema Service]
Desolation in 'R-Point' [Credit: Cinema Service]

3. Come and See

  • Released: 1985
  • Director: Elem Klimov
  • Which War: World War II

Following a young recruit during the Belorussian resistance to the Nazi occupation in 1943, Come and See is the most unflinching and unpleasant war movie you're ever likely to see. In one screening, an old German man told the audience,

"I was a soldier of the Wehrmacht... I will testify: everything that is told in this film is the truth. And the most frightening and shameful thing for me is that this film will be seen by my children and grandchildren."

'Come and See' [Credit: Sovexportfilm]
'Come and See' [Credit: Sovexportfilm]

4. Inglourious Basterds

  • Released: 2009
  • Director: Quentin Tarantino
  • Which War: World War II

In an audacious (and deeply satisfying) alternative history, Tarantino assembles all major Nazi figureheads in occupied Paris and gleefully slaughters them all. The cult director is known for his unapologetic violent streak, and Inglourious Basterds culminates in the most cathartic revisionist orgy on celluloid. Fantastic.

Melanie Laurent takes sweet revenge in 'Inglourious Basterds' [Credit: Universal Pictures]
Melanie Laurent takes sweet revenge in 'Inglourious Basterds' [Credit: Universal Pictures]

5. Black Death

  • Released: 2010
  • Director: Christopher Smith
  • Which War: War of the Breton Succession (part of the Hundred Years War)

Although set during the Hundred Years War, the real battle here is between millions of Britons and one disease-riddled rat. Sean Bean and a disappointingly un-tonsured Eddie Redmayne are part of a knightly quest that goes codpiece-up when they're waylaid by a strange sect, isolated from the spread of the bubonic plague.

A filthy rabble in 'Black Death' [Credit: Revolver Entertainment]
A filthy rabble in 'Black Death' [Credit: Revolver Entertainment]

6. Ravenous

  • Released: 1999
  • Director: Antonia Bird
  • Which War: Mexican-American War (1846 – 1848)

Captain Boyd plumbs the dark depths of survival and culinary tolerance when cannibalism becomes the only option to avoid starvation in the American wilderness. Robert Carlyle is an even bigger psycho in this than he was in Trainspotting, if you can believe such a thing.

Robert Carlyle gets blooded in 'Ravenous' [Credit: 20th Century Fox]
Robert Carlyle gets blooded in 'Ravenous' [Credit: 20th Century Fox]

7. Men Behind The Sun

  • Released: 1988
  • Director: T. F. Mou
  • Which War: World War II, Japan

Burying a baby in the snow, the dissection of a live child, the stripping of frostbitten flesh clean from bone, a man defecating his own viscera. Japan's secret bio-weaponry lab, Unit 731, conducted inhumane experiments on Chinese and Soviet prisoners in the Second World War and Men Behind The Sun presents its grisly subject matter with documentary-style gloom. Andrey Iskanov's Philosophy of a Knife (four hours long!) is also about Unit 731.

Human experiments in 'The Men Behind The Sun' [Credit: Grand Essex Enterprises]
Human experiments in 'The Men Behind The Sun' [Credit: Grand Essex Enterprises]

8. Casualties of War

  • Released: 1989
  • Director: Brian De Palma
  • Which War: Vietnam War

Based on the true story of the 1966 Incident on Hill 192, director Brian De Palma had been trying to get this movie made since the early '70s, but was considered too inflammatory for cinemas. This unflinching retelling of the gang rape and murder of Vietnamese woman Phan Thi Mao by American soldiers is incredibly uncomfortable viewing.

Thuy Thu Le and Michael J. Fox in 'Casualties of War' [Credit: Columbia Pictures]
Thuy Thu Le and Michael J. Fox in 'Casualties of War' [Credit: Columbia Pictures]

9. Braveheart

  • Released: 1995
  • Director: Mel Gibson
  • Which War: First War of Scottish Independence (1296–1328)

Years before his gore-tastic hits The Passion of the Christ and Apocalypto, Mel Gibson brought the Battle of Stirling Bridge to life. There's impalement a-plenty as arrows meet arses and the Scots fight back against vile English imperialism.

Mel leads the charge in 'Braveheart' [Credit: 20th Century Fox]
Mel leads the charge in 'Braveheart' [Credit: 20th Century Fox]

10. We Were Soldiers

  • Released: 2002
  • Director: Randall Wallace
  • Which War: First Indochina War

Don't be fooled by the schmaltzy tone of We Were Soldiers: the death scenes don't pull any punches. The Battle of Ia Drang littered the ground with corpses, burnt, broken and mutilated beyond recognition, and the film uses SFX to render these images as horrifically as possible.

Napalm is particularly gruesome in 'We Were Soldiers' [Credit: Paramount Pictures]
Napalm is particularly gruesome in 'We Were Soldiers' [Credit: Paramount Pictures]

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