ByCarlos Rosario Gonzalez, writer at Creators.co
This Earth's Sorcerer Supreme. I'm currently stuck in the Matrix and can't get out. I also write. | Twitter: @Lonelez
Carlos Rosario Gonzalez

The debate surrounding comic book movies as art has been buzzing since Bryan Singer sparked the modern mainstream popularity of the genre with the X-Men film franchise back in the year 2000. Since then, superhero comic book movies have dominated Hollywood, and this year alone over a dozen superhero movies have hit the silver screen. Despite the overwhelming success of these films, many auteur directors like Luc Besson (Valerian, Lucy), have argued that these types of movies have plagued the film industry, due to their simplistic approach to storytelling. Now director David Fincher (Gone Girl, Fight Club) has added fuel to the fire.

While promoting his upcoming Netflix project Mindhunter (via Yellow King Film Boy), Fincher said:

Look, there’s a very large talent pool of people who are- don’t feel there’s much for them in terms of sustenance working for Marvel. And I think that if we can make a playground for them that is thoughtful, adult, interesting, complex, challenging stories and figure out ways to pull them into it, there’s a chance at something that isn’t lassoed and hogtied by three acts. And there’s something else that doesn’t have to be 22-minute half hour or have a cliffhanger. I think it is an exciting time.

While some Marvel movies tend to follow the same three act structure, there are standalone stories like Logan that manage to innovate and experiment. Also, the most standout chapters in these franchises shine in part because of the careful hands of the director behind the camera. The best way for Marvel to add sustenance and depth to their movies is by having top-tier directors like Taika Waititi (Thor: Ragnarok) and Ryan Coogler (Black Panther) directing these movies.

So, let's add David Fincher to this cast so he doesn't feel too left out. We'll even give him the material to work with. Here are five Marvel comic books and graphic novels that Fincher should direct.

5. 'The Death Of Captain Marvel'

[Credit: Marvel Comics]
[Credit: Marvel Comics]

The Death of Captain Marvel is one of Marvel Comics' most profound storylines, as it tells the tale of Mar-Vell's battle against cancer. This would be a film where Fincher could explore various themes that are rarely dug into with superhero movies, and since the film would be set primarily in space, Fincher has ample room to create his own universe. What makes The Death of Captain Marvel so captivating is that the villain of the story is a disease rather than a human, and Fincher would undoubtedly be able to bring such a story to life.

4. 'Marvel Zombies'

[Credit: Marvel Studios]
[Credit: Marvel Studios]

With Fox taking a dive in the horror genre with The New Mutants, it's about time Marvel Studios did as well. And what better horror comic book storyline to adapt to the big screen than Marvel Zombies?

This would not only be a whole new ballpark for Marvel Studios, but for Fincher as well, who's never made a pure horror film before. Fincher is known for his psychological thrillers, but superhero zombies with a touch of Fincher is a film I'd pay twice to see.

3. 'House Of M'

[Credit: Marvel Comics]
[Credit: Marvel Comics]

The House of M storyline saw Scarlet Witch wipe out 90 percent of the mutant population. This plot could be touched on in the existing MCU without mutants, but I think the House of M storyline could work best in the X-Men universe, via a different character: Franklin Richards. Fox could use this storyline to finally combine the Fantastic Four and the X-Men cinematic universes, and of course Fincher would be a fantastic choice to direct.

2. 'Spider-Man 2099'

[Credit: Marvel]
[Credit: Marvel]

Spider-Man 2099 has a new web crawler, Miguel O'Hara, as the friendly neighborhood Spider-Man of the year 2099. Set in the future, Fincher could explore various themes of technology and consumerism like he did in Fight Club, or approach the future setting in a whole new and innovating way. The best part is that since the story takes place in the far future, it doesn't have to connect to grand , so Fincher has free roam.

1. 'Marvels'

[Credit: Marvel, Alex Ross]
[Credit: Marvel, Alex Ross]

Created by Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross, Marvels was a four-issue limited series comic run that told the story of the Marvel Universe from the perspective of a civilian called Phil Sheldon. Phil experienced many of the most famous Marvel stories, like the formation of the Avengers and the first appearance of Galactus on Earth. There's no doubt Fincher would catch the essence of this classic story, especially since the focused characters of the story are not the superheroes.

What comic book or graphic novel would you want David Fincher to adapt? Let me know in the comments!

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