ByDean Round, writer at Creators.co
Fan of good ol' slasher films. Love me a bit of Jaws too! https://twitter.com/Dean_Round_1979
Dean Round

On December 20, 1996, a little-known film called Scream hit cinemas, Made on a shoestring budget of only $14,000,000, and starring a string of little-known actors, the film was labelled D.O.A. by Variety Magazine before it was even released. Fast forward 20 years, and the film can now be frequently found in various polls naming it as one of the best movies ever made, including Entertainment Weekly, Bravo and Empire.

To this day, Scream remains as one of the highest grossing franchises of all time, with a worldwide box office gross of $604.400,000, $173,046,663 of which came from the original. Even himself has become somewhat of a legend, being voted for in polls by IGN and pastemagazine as one of the most iconic horror movie villains ever.

So, in order to celebrate the masterpiece that was , let's take a closer look at the film, including deleted scenes and trivia. And don't forget to sound off in the comments section below!

11. The Film Was Thought (By Some) To Be A Comedy

The film's high school scenes were originally set to be shot at Santa Rosa High School in the Santa Rosa, California. However, the school originally thought the film was going to be a comedy, and the board denied the film to be shot there after reading the script.

Following their denial, production was moved to Healdsburg, California, and shot at the Sonoma Community Center instead.

Wes Craven didn't want to brush this under the carpet however, and decided to put in a not-so-special thanks section at the end of the film's credits.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

10. The VHS Box For 'Scream' Is Seen In The Movie

Remember when Randy and Stu are discussing the killings in the video store before Billy arrives? Randy says that the police are always off track and states that if they'd watch Prom Night (1980), then they'd save time.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

And he was right too, sorta. Maybe not watching Prom Night (1980), but watching Scream (1996) instead. Considering that some people have pointed out that the VHS version appears to be sitting on the TV behind him when he is explaining "The Rules" at the house party. Surely if they would've watched that before watching Halloween (1978), then that may have saved a lot of time. And death.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

9. Skeet Ulrich's Pain Was All Too Real

Towards the climax of the film, Sidney dons the Ghostface costume and comes out of the closet, stabbing Billy with an umbrella. Skeet Ulrich had a protective pad attached to his chest, which the umbrella struck first time around. However, the second strike missed the protective pad, and struck Ulrich in the chest. During his childhood, Ulrich had open-heart surgery, and subsequently had to have metal wiring placed under his skin. When the umbrella missed its target, Ulrich's pain was real, and Craven decided to keep the shot in the film due to its authenticity.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

8. Billy Really WAS Ghostface

When Randy is left alone watching Halloween (1978), Ghostface appears behind him. This is the only scene where Ghostface is played by one of the actors, rather than a stunt double. Skeet Ulrich requested whether he could wear the costume for one scene, which Craven agreed to.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

7. Principal Himbry Wasn't Going To Die

While reading through the script, executive producer Bob Weinstein noticed that there were about 30 pages in the script where nobody was murdered. Kevin Williamson recalls:

"After he (Bob Weinstein) had bought the script, he felt that there was 30 pages where nothing happened. And he called me up and said, 'You gotta kill somebody, Kevin. Somebody's gotta die.' There is a thirty-minute gap where nobody's getting offed. He said, 'I don't care how you do it; just do it.'" Weinstein's idea also helped solve Williamson's problem in the script: "I didn't know how to get rid of all the partiers," says Williamson. "We wanted to isolate our core group and then once when Bob came up with the idea and said you had to kill somebody else — and that shows the — there was the answer. And in addition I got to carry on that hard-edge, cynical attitude that children have today."

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

6. Tatum's Death Was Never Meant For The Garage Door

Poor old Tatum was meant to get into a fist fight with Ghostface before the garage door came down on her neck. However, the scene was changed after Kevin Williamson thought of the idea after a conversation with his assistant. On a side note — actress Rose McGowan was so small that she was able to fit through the dog door with ease, so to prevent her from falling out, they had to nail her shirt to the door.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

5. Father Death Was The Real Killer, Not Ghostface

When Sidney is at the police station after being attacked at home, Dewey arrives with a sealed Ghostface costume. The packaging describes the outfit as being "Father Death" rather than Ghostface. In fact, the term Ghostface was only referenced once, by Tatum in the garage, when she declares, "Please don't kill me Mr. Ghostface. I wanna be in the sequel!"

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

4. The Police Accidentally Received An On-Set Call For Help

Everybody remembers the tagline on the poster: Don't Answer The Phone. Don't Open The Door. Don't Try To Escape

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

This is great advice for the production crew as well, considering that somebody forgot to unplug the phone when Casey Becker was being terrorized at the start of the film. When Becker tried to contact the police, 911 operators were quite disturbed to hear her pleading for her life on the other end of the line.

3. Stu Macher Was In the Sequel And Was Supposed To Return For A Third Movie

When Sidney proved that too much TV can, in fact, kill you, we all thought that Stu was dead.

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

But a screen shot from the sequel shows that Stu was still very much alive. If you look behind Randy's right ear, you can see a party guest with blonde hair, which, incidentally, is actor Matthew Lillard, who played Stu in the first film!

'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]
'Scream' [Credit: Dimension]

However, Lillard was due to reprise his role as Stu Macher in Scream 3 (2000). An early script had Macher orchestrating the killings from his prison cell, something which you can hear the actor talk about, below.

2. The Original Concept Art Depicts A Completely Different Ghostface

Could you imagine Ghostface looking anything other than what he does today? Originally, he was meant to don a white robe, which may have not made that much difference. But looking at these concept drawings of what Ghostface may have looked like, I'm glad they came up with the iconic mask.

1. The Uncut Scenes

It has been well documented that Wes Craven and the Weinstein brothers clashed with American censors, the MPAA, about getting the film an R-Rating, which would allow anyone under 17 to attend with adult supervision They were told that the film had to be cut, otherwise it would be rated an NC-17, (the old X rating), which would only allow adults to watch it, and therefore limit the box office takings. Having made several changes and edits, Craven would end up submitting his edits nine times before the MPAA awarded it an R rating.

So there you have it, a gentle recap into the background of this amazing film. What did you guys think? Is Scream the best slasher movie ever made? Vote in the poll below, and don't forget to sound off in the comments section too!

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