ByJennifer Geacone-Cruz, writer at Creators.co
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Jennifer Geacone-Cruz

So Argo won Best Picture at the Oscars. The story behind it is pretty well known and it really does make for a great movie. What I'm more interested in, however, is what the actual movie 'Argo' would have looked like if it had been made. Seeing as they tried to make the whole thing look as convincing as possible, of course there are storyboards. And what storyboards they are, starring the likes of... Galactus?

Yup, you heard me. I swear that the storyboards for faux-feature-film Argo are filled with clones of the Devourer of Worlds. See for yourself:

Do you see what I see? How is that possible?

It all comes down to the artist, whose signature you can see at the bottom of these boards, dated 1978. You are not hallucinating; it says Jack Kirby. As in, the artist who brought Captain America, The Fantastic Four, Hulk, Thor, the X-Men, and more to the pages of comics the world over. Looks like Kirby decided that a little Galactus-style cosmic Titan wouldn't hurt.

Logically, the next question is, "What the heck was Jack Kirby doing drawing storyboards for a fake movie?" Well, these were storyboards for an actual movie, or one that was in development at one point at least, called [Lord of Light]((http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LordofLight). What's even crazier is that the storyboards doubled as concept art for what was going to be a sci-fi themed amusement park. Kirby, arguably one of the most significant and prolific comic book artists of the last 50 years, was hired to do the boards and concept art for the movie based on a sci-fi/fantasy book by Roger Zelasny. Zelasny was something of a head-in-the-clouds dreamer and a real life crook, and when the project disintegrated amidst allegations of him embezzling the money invested in it, the storyboards were left to gather dust.

Galactus predates the Lord of Light art by 12 years (he first showed up in 1966), so it would be pretty safe to say that beyond the general classic Galactus look that originated with Kirby and has been riffed on countless times since then, the Lord of Light art's resemblance is most likely due to the artist's signature style and some parallels in story motifs.

Lord of Light and its role in the Canadian Caper and the film Argo is now the subject of a documentary by Judd Ehrlich, called Science Fiction Land. Sounds interesting, and I'm totally going to give it a watch. Just another fascinating layer to the story of Argo.


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