ByMichael Johnson, writer at Creators.co
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Michael Johnson

Though production isn't set to start until 2018, director Matt Reeves has been answering questions about his highly anticipated movie, The Batman. During interviews Reeves has stated that he plans to adopt inspiration from film noir and Alfred Hitchcock movies.

Rumors have been circulating about what Matt Reeves's vision could be. What will his script look like? Which story arc will he adopt? While Reeves has yet to reveal what will be about, the Cloverfield director's history proves that a Jason Todd story arc is ideal for his debut, and 's animated film Under the Red Hood makes perfect sense.

Under The Hood Of Planet Of The Apes

If you've been following Matt Reeves, you've probably heard of his comparisons between Batman and Cesar:

"[Batman] is a tortured soul who is grappling with his past and trying to find a way to be in a world that has a lot that’s wrong with it and trying to find a way to reconcile all of that … That is a really powerful character, in the same way that Caesar is such a powerful character."

In some respects the abused, tortured tragic story of Jason Todd also reflects Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. After years of suffering at the hands of man — being held captive and hunted ─ the apes now have the upper hand. So, if Bruce Wayne is like Caesar, then Jason Todd is Koba as they both were beaten.

'Dawn of the Planet of the Apes' [Credit: Fox] / [Credit: DC Comics]
'Dawn of the Planet of the Apes' [Credit: Fox] / [Credit: DC Comics]

Furthermore, they both have eye-opening revelations and decide that violence, treachery and anarchy are the best ways to seek retribution. Instead of talking it out like two supremely intelligent apes, Koba sets up his own false flag operation. After stealing guns, he murders several humans then kills one his own and shoots Caesar, causing panic that allows him to run the colony.

After Jason is beaten to death by Joker and resurrected, he fought on the wrong side of the law. Going by the name — a name formerly used by Joker — Bruce Wayne's former sidekick became a renown criminal and antihero. Jason, like Koba, wanted to instill his newfound principles on the city of Gotham, believing that lethal force was an absolute necessity. Jason wanted Batman to adopt his philosophy, starting with the Joker — a life for a life.

[Credit: DC Comics]
[Credit: DC Comics]

Like Caesar, Batman was the ultimate victor, protecting Gotham with a no-kill philosophy. However, if you watched BvS you'll see that despite Batman not killing Joker, there was a tragic event in his life that led him to become the hero that would make Red Hood proud.

While Dawn of the Planet of Apes may have some similarities to the story of Jason Todd and Batman, Matt Reeves has another film that reflects who was before Red Hood.

Let Me In: A Reflection Of Jason's Childhood

'Let Me In' [Credit: Overture Films / Relativity Media]
'Let Me In' [Credit: Overture Films / Relativity Media]

Matt Reeves can also tell the Jason Todd story thanks to his ability to how a teen's feeling of abandonment can lead to him or her making volatile and dangerous decisions, as shown in Let Me In. This horror movie is about a bullied 12-year-old boy (Owen) who finds comfort in a vampire (Abby) who hasn't aged past 12. Let Me In may not seem like it relates to Jason Todd at first glance, but there are some similarities.

Both Jason and Owen felt isolated and used immoral judgment as a result of their sense of desolation. Owen's mother, for all her effort, mentally checked out — distracted by marital problems with a husband (like Todd's father) who was nowhere to be found. Despite his mother's physical presence and efforts to instill a religious background, Owen was lost. During prayer he steals money from her purse. Stealing was more than just coping mechanism for Jason, who stole for survival. In fact, Jason was caught trying to steal tires off the Batmobile.

[Credit: DC Comics]
[Credit: DC Comics]

After his death, Jason was a changed man, so much so that he fought on the wrong side of the law. Owen based on his choice to leave town with Abby after she ripped his adversaries apart, also opting to side with "evil."

There's also a comparison to be drawn between the Dark Knight and Abby. While on the surface the two could not be further apart, the two of them attract troubled teens. Batman continues to attract damaged teenage sidekicks, whether he wants them or not: Dick Grayson, Jason Todd, Tim Drake, etc. No matter the fate of their predecessors they all leave, but another always signs on.

When we first meet Abby, she has a man only known as her "father" who kills and harvests people blood for her survival. It's later revealed that Abby had known the man since they were children. This can only mean that Abby's "father" is what Owen has become — someone who needs her. Though, the argument can be made that unlike Abby, Batman needs his sidekicks to help keep him human.

[Credit: DC Comics]
[Credit: DC Comics]

Whether it be a shaky found footage film like Cloverfield or a blockbuster science-fiction western like Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Matt Reeves has proved he's a genius. Reeves's The Batman may not adapt Under the Red Hood, but we can certainly expect it to be a spectacle.

What do you think of Matt Reeves adapting the story of Jason Todd and Under the Red Hood?

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