ByKit Simpson Browne, writer at Creators.co
Staff Writer, Superheroes, Star Wars and such. Bad jokes aplenty. Can be gently prodded on Twitter at @kitsb1
Kit Simpson Browne

Now, while Warner Bros.' breakout hit of the summer, Suicide Squad, made a whole lot of money, it also wound up on the receiving end of a whole lot of criticism from both fans and critics. Many took issue with the film's pacing, dialogue, style and lack of focus, while others still were uncomfortable with its loose adaptation of several beloved comic book characters. In particular, some of us took issue with the film's decision to strip its female lead, , of much of her individual agency, all the while turning her into a hyper-sexualized female object that had little in common with the vast majority of her comic book incarnations.

That, of course, had a lot to do with the fact that her costume — much like those of the film's other young female leads — was apparently designed by someone more interested in showing skin and highlighting curves than in facilitating the committing of criminal acts (or saving the world).

As it turns out, though...

Harley Quinn's Original 'Suicide Squad' Costume Designs Were Even More Problematic Than The Ones We Saw In The Movie

'Suicide Squad' [Warner Bros.]
'Suicide Squad' [Warner Bros.]

That, at least, is one of the more obvious responses to the early costume, makeup and tattoo designs for Harley that illustrator Tina Charad recently unveiled online. After all, while the images below are often striking — and in several cases would have made for a far more visually distinct movie — they're also often rather problematic.

After all, while these alternate facial tattoo designs would have been an intriguing addition...

[Tina Charad]
[Tina Charad]

...and some of these clothing choices seem to hint at a fascinating alternate take on the character...

[Tina Charad]
[Tina Charad]

...it's pretty tough to imagine that stamping 'puddin' on Harley's butt or tattooing 's face on her chest would have done anything other than add to the overarching sense of objectification (and, much as in the final film, the implication that her character was entirely defined by her relationship to The Joker):

[Tina Charad]
[Tina Charad]

After all, while designs like these are visually arresting, they're also hyper-sexualized to the point of insanity — and about as far away from her old-school Harlequin outfit as it's possible to get.

[Tina Charad]
[Tina Charad]

In other words? While the images might well be incredibly impressive...

[Tina Charad]
[Tina Charad]

...it might just be for the best that we ended up with the final costume that we did:

Better the devil you know, and all that...

What do you think, though? Would you have preferred to see Harley in a different outfit — and if so, what kind? Let us know below!

(Sources: Imgur)

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