ByDavid Opie, writer at Creators.co
Editor: @DavidOpie and [email protected] Still waiting for a Marvel Zombies Ghibli movie directed by Xavier Dolan...
David Opie

If you've watched the first official trailer for Stephen King's It (2017), then we assume that you've chosen to read this easter egg breakdown under strict instruction from your therapist. How will they ever let you out of your padded cell unless you understand exactly why Pennywise floats in your dreams each night?

Well, now's the time to let your fears wash away. Let's descend into Derry's dank sewer system, and discover exactly how director Andrés Muschietti will make coulrophobes of us all.

If you don't enjoy sleep or sanity, check out the official trailer for 'It' once again in the clip below:

Join us as we break down how the It movie trailer compares to both the TV adaptation and Stephen King's original novel. What have you got to lose? It's not like you're going to sleep tonight anyway.

Wax On, Wax Off

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Stephen King's original horror fest was released in 1986, so it made sense that the past segment was set in the '50s in the original book. However, now that the movie adaptation will kick off in the '80s, Muschietti can pay homage to the era in which It was first written.

This becomes immediately apparent from the very beginning of the trailer, when Bill has a hand in his younger brother's untimely death. Attention to detail in this scene is particularly impressive, including the inclusion of paraffin wax that Georgie needs to waterproof his paper boat.

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

This was not the only subtle reference to the era in question. We also saw Bill's fascination with space, a poster for 'Advanced Dungeons & Dragons' in the bedroom, and Eddie's killer Airwolf t-shirt, because why the f**k not.

Derry, Maine Comes To Life

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Perhaps arguable even moreso than Pennywise himself, Derry is the star of It. Thus, the town's prominence in this first trailer is a huge nod to the fans.

From the many street names taken directly from the novel to the map spotted in the projector scene, the seemingly idyllic town of Derry has painstakingly been brought to life, complete with rotten sewers underneath. Just thank your lucky stars that King's creepiest setting is entirely fictional.

Jackson Street Should Seem Familiar To Diehard Stephen King Fans

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Right before Georgie joins Pennywise in the sewers, the trailer makes a point of proving just how much Muschietti did his homework, reminding viewers that the film's most iconic scene takes place at the intersection between Jackson Street and Witcham Street.

This particular location continues to play a prominent role throughout the original novel. We first visit the intersection when Jackson Street becomes the scene of another murder (RIP Betty Ripsom), and then again when Pennywise mocks Georgie's death in 1985, convincing Mike Hanlon to regroup with his friends against the Dancing Clown.

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

The murder of Georgie Denbrough on 18 October, 1957 is also mentioned in the novel 11/22/63, when Derry barman Fred Toomey relates the gory tale to protagonist Jake Epping. Without understanding the true horror that lies at the heart of Derry, Toomey tried to explain the murders away by suggesting that there's a crazy serial killer living down in the sewers. To be fair, he's not entirely wrong...

29 Neibolt Street Is Just One Big Nope

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Soon after the events located at Jackson Street unfold, the trailer takes us to a real fixer-upper on 29 Neibolt Street, which is where the Losers Club confront Pennywise for the first time altogether.

Not only have the production team perfectly nailed the look of the house, but there's also a brief scene where Eddie runs away from Pennywise (who's taken the form of a diseased leper), promising to give us yet even more nightmares in the final release.

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

As if that wasn't scary enough, the scene where we watch the Losers Club recoil in terror from Pennywise is actually even more terrifying than we first thought. If you look closely enough, you'll realize that the claws growing through the Dancing Clown's gloves signal his transformation into a werewolf, personifying one of the many fears that the children hold in their hearts.

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Didn't We Just See The Losers Club On Netflix? 'Stranger Things' Have Happened...

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Much has been made of the Stephen King references scattered throughout the show Stranger Things, drawing comparisons with Stand By Me and even It, but things now come full circle with this shot of the children that's eerily reminiscent of the hit Netflix show. Take off Finn Wolfhard's glasses and he could easily be playing Mike Wheeler instead of Richie Tozier, decked out in the same style of '80s clothing.

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Intricate character details from the book can also be spotted throughout the trailer, including Eddie Kaspbrak's signature inhaler, Ben Hanscom’s adorably chubby cheeks and Beverly Marsh’s spare apartment key, which can be spotted hanging around her neck. If the book is anything to go by, watch out for this key to play a bigger role in the It movie adaptation than newcomers might expect.

Beverely Sinks To A New Low

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Spot that black goop gushing out of an exploding sink? In the novel, the vile liquid is actually blood, but Andres Muschietti was forced to change the color in the trailer so that it could be distributed to wider audiences. This scene also confirms that poor Beverley Marsh will experience her character's most traumatic moment once again, complete with extra blood that we saw in the TV adaptation.

Bow(ers) Before The Might Of Pennywise

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

While the trailer focuses more on the Losers Club than their immoral counterparts, the Bowers Gang will also play a large role in the It movie adaptation. Their most notable inclusion here is a flyer that reveals Patrick Hockstetter has gone missing.

In the novel, Hockstetter is easily one of the most disturbed antagonists, gaining a sexual thrill from the murder of his younger brother. Despite It's R rating, scenes such as this may be toned down or reimagined completely, although we still hope to see Patrick's leech-ridden death onscreen.

"Don't Open, Dead Inside"

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

One of the more disturbing parts of the trailer perfectly captures a key moment for Mike Hanlon's character in the book while simultaneously reminding us of this decade's most popular horror show.

The Walking Dead [Credit: AMC]
The Walking Dead [Credit: AMC]

The scene in question shows Chosen Jacobs's character recoil as charred hands emerge from behind a locked metal door. Inspired by his father's story of a fire that took place at the Black Spot, those clamoring hands sure do look a lot like the zombies from the first episode of The Walking Dead. Intentional homage or horrific coincidence? Either way, we were left shook by the disturbing imagery on display.

Projecting Our Darkest Fears

It [Credit: New Line Cinema]
It [Credit: New Line Cinema]

Aside from the soul-destroying moment when Pennywise runs towards Bill in the basement, what seems to have stuck most in people's minds is the projector scene, where slides of Georgie's mother transform into something far more sinister.

In the book and TV adaptation, Pennywise taunts the Losers Club from the confines of a picture stuck in a photo album, but this update is arguably far more effective. No matter how much you may cherish Tim Curry's performance in the TV version, it's hard to deny that the projector concept works better onscreen, while also helping to further establish the film in the '80s time period.

See also:

Although it's extremely promising to see how Muschietti has put his own spin on It, all while remaining faithful to the tone and style of the original novel, what we're hoping to see most in the final release is some more easter eggs hinting at a wider Stephen King shared universe. After all, if Beverley and Richie from the Losers Club can make an appearance in James Franco's TV adaptation of 11/22/63, then anything's possible, right?

Poll

Do you think that the final release of It will be as good as the trailer suggests?

(Poll Image Credit: New Line Cinema)

Trending

Latest from our Creators