ByMichael Patterson, writer at Creators.co
I Write. Sometimes. Follow me on Twitter: @MichaelP93
Michael Patterson

This article contains major spoilers for Kong: Skull Island.

Fans of have been eagerly anticipating the release of Kong: Skull Island, hoping that it would live up to expectations and bring our favorite movie monster back in a worthy new adventure. And I can easily say that it delivered in every way imaginable! Not only is Skull Island a worthy entry in the franchise, it also has me incredibly excited for what comes next.

But one of the best things about the film was its consistent tributes to what came before. While it did contain some pretty neat Easter Eggs and references to other films, such as Samuel L. Jackson reviving a line from Jurassic Park, it also paid tribute to many of the previous King Kong films. So with that in mind, let's take a look at some of the callbacks to previous Kongs featured in Skull Island.

The Fog Around The Island

Look familiar: The fog around the island. [Credit: Warner Bros./Paramount]
Look familiar: The fog around the island. [Credit: Warner Bros./Paramount]
  • Callback to: King Kong (1976)

Perhaps the thing that made Skull Island seem so terrifying to everyone in the beginning was the thick bed of fog that surrounded it. This was clearly a nod to the 1976 remake of King Kong, which came up with the idea. And Skull Island marks the first time the fog has returned on screen since.

The Octopus

Kong has a history with octopi. [Credit: Toho/Warner Bros]
Kong has a history with octopi. [Credit: Toho/Warner Bros]
  • Callback to: King Kong Vs. Godzilla (1962)

In Kong: Skull Island, our favorite ape finds himself ambushed by a relentless octopus. The sea-creature wraps itself around him and refuses to let go. But Kong manages to break free by killing the creature. He then decides to feast on its legs before dragging it away with him. I guess he likes seafood!

Kong vs Octopus.
Kong vs Octopus.

But this wasn't the first time the Eighth Wonder of the World was attacked by an octopus. He was first ambushed by a red octopus in 1962's King Kong Vs. Godzilla — incredibly ironic considering that Skull Island set up the next clash between the two movie monsters.

The Log Monster

The log monster looked familair. [Credit: Warner Bros./RKO/Paramount/Universal]
The log monster looked familair. [Credit: Warner Bros./RKO/Paramount/Universal]
  • Callback to: King Kong (1933), King Kong (1976), King Kong (2005)

There were lots of creatures on Skull Island, but perhaps none were as unusual as the log monster. While he ends up being more adorable than anything else, his very existence reminded us of one of the most sinister — but iconic — King Kong scenes.

In all three versions of the original Kong story, the giant gorilla slays many of his human foes by tossing the log they were crossing off a cliff, sending them into the pits below.

The Wall Around The Island

The wall in the original "King Kong" [Credit: RKO Pictures]
The wall in the original "King Kong" [Credit: RKO Pictures]
  • Callback to: King Kong (1933), King Kong (1976), King Kong (2005)

In the film, there is a section of the island free from monsters, protected by a giant wall that the natives built. Any King Kong fan will know that the original 1933 film — and its subsequent remakes — have all featured a giant wall built to keep Kong and the treacherous creatures away from their civilization. The only difference here is that in Skull Island, the wall is less due to the danger of Kong himself and more based on the danger of the creatures.

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The Battle With The Skull Crawler

Kong's battle with the Skull Crawler looked familiar. [Credit: Warner Bros./Universal]
Kong's battle with the Skull Crawler looked familiar. [Credit: Warner Bros./Universal]
  • Callback to: King Kong (2005)

Kong found himself taking on quite a lot of Skull Crawlers throughout the course of Skull Island. There's even one scene where he takes on two of them at once. These battle scenes weren't only visually stunning, but they also happened to pay tribute to Kong's battle with the V-Rexes in Peter Jackson's 2005 remake of King Kong.

Jackson's remake actually features Kong battling two to three V-Rexes at once, and it's clear that this epic confrontation inspired Skull Island's clash. In fact, there's even a scene where Kong tries to break the Skull Crawler's jaw — much like he did to the V-Rex in the 2005 film — and he also resorts to ripping a creature's reptilian tongue out.

Breaker Of Chains

Kong has a colorful history with chains. [Credit: Warner Bros./RKO]
Kong has a colorful history with chains. [Credit: Warner Bros./RKO]
  • Callback to: King Kong (1933), King Kong (1976), King Kong (2005)

You may remember when the Skull Crawler forces Kong into a pile of wreckage and he finds himself restrained by heavy metal chains. At first, the giant ape struggles to break free. He eventually does, but not before angrily pulling his arms to loosen the chains wrapped around his wrist.

This scene was reminiscent of the iconic scene from the 1933 original in which the captured Kong is put on stage in New York for all the world to see. His arms are restrained by heavy metallic chains exactly like the ones in Kong: Skull Island. Recreating his ritualistic wedding with Ann Darrow proves to be a big mistake, as it eventually angers the beast, who breaks the chains.

Kong chained up in the 2005 remake. [Credit: Universal]
Kong chained up in the 2005 remake. [Credit: Universal]

The scene also inspired a similar scene in the 1976 remake, before it was directly recreated in the 2005 remake.

Kong Rescues Weaver

Kong rescues Weaver and blow-dries Dwan. [Credit: Warner Bros./Paramount]
Kong rescues Weaver and blow-dries Dwan. [Credit: Warner Bros./Paramount]
  • Callback to: King Kong (1976)

When Brie Larson's Weaver ends up falling into the surrounding water, Kong fishes her out, saving her. However, there's a shot where he looks at her unconscious, soaked body with such affection that it reminded me of a scene from the 1976 King Kong. In that film, Kong holds Jessica Lange's Dwan under a waterfall before affectionately staring at her as he dries her with his breath — which gives a whole new meaning to the term "blow dry."

This was a subtle but awesome way to pay tribute to the most underappreciated of the Kong films.

'Kong: Skull Island' is out now.
'Kong: Skull Island' is out now.

King Kong may be back and bigger than ever in Skull Island, but it's good to see that he hasn't forgotten where he came from. I have to commend director Jordan Vogt Roberts for doing an incredible job of paying tribute to all iterations of the movie monster that came before, while still managing to make Skull Island feel like a fresh take on Kong. It has already earned its place in Kong's legendary collection of films.

Did you spot any King Kong callbacks in Kong: Skull Island? Let us know in the comments below!

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