ByEleanor Tremeer, writer at Creators.co
MP staff. I talk about Star Wars a lot. Sometimes I'm paid for it. Twitter: @ExtraTremeerial | Email: [email protected]
Eleanor Tremeer

Legends of Tomorrow is the weirdest, whackiest, and sometimes the worst Arrowverse show. Season 1 was undeniably shaky — though it had its charm, winning over many fans (such as myself) with an underdog crew of B-list superheroes, and a new historically dubious adventure each week.

With the lowest viewing figures out of The CW's four shows, Legends of Tomorrow had a lot to prove come Season 2 — yet somehow, against all the odds, this gang of misfits (don't call them heroes) managed to overcome their bad rep, transforming Legends of Tomorrow into the best show in the . Seriously.

But before we start, a disclaimer. If you've read any of my many (many) Arrowverse recaps you'll know that I usually praise Supergirl as the best show of the bunch. And for a while, that was true — both Supergirl and Legends had a strong start in their respective Season 2s, and while Legends floundered with filler episodes, Supergirl went from strength to strength. However, just like Season 1, Supergirl Season 2 suffers from a lack of followthrough.

The second half of Supergirl's sophomore season has so far fallen short of expectations, with the writers chucking any and every subplot they could think of into the show like so many darts at a dartboard. Meanwhile, once Legends got over the aggravating paint-by-numbers episodes (which were probably thrown in to pack out the show's 12-episode arc after Season 2 was extended to 17 episodes) Legends really came into its own by embracing its concept and realizing one crucial thing — team dynamic is everything.

The Legends' Time Has Come

Legends of Tomorrow's improvement was especially noticeable in the finale, which saw the writers really run with the weirdness of time travel, finally answering the pesky question of "if the Legends have a time machine, why don't they just go back and fix everything?" Well, now we know why — because they'll break time.

The Legends break time. [Credit: The CW]
The Legends break time. [Credit: The CW]

But before we got to the finale's thrilling cliffhanger — which sets up a fascinating situation for Season 3 to explore — the Legends teamed up with their past selves to ensure that the Legion never got their hands on the spear (for the first time... again). This made for an exciting, Back To The Future 2 style episode, with just as many paradoxes and hilarious accidents as Marty caused.

The final battle, set against the backdrop of WWI No Man's Land, was one of the show's best, and Sara's solution to the problem of the Spear's power was simply inspired — proving once again that elevating her to captain (and unofficial protagonist of the show) is the secret of Legends' success.

Sara Lance has long been one of the most popular characters in the Arrowverse, thanks to her role as the Canary on Arrow. Her death, criticized by fans and critics alike, was reversed so she could return to star in Legends of Tomorrow, and she quickly became the most fun part of a thoroughly enjoyable show.

"This ain't my first rodeo." [Credit: The CW]
"This ain't my first rodeo." [Credit: The CW]

A lot of Legends' screentime has dealt with Sara's development from tortured assassin to responsible leader, and the writers took special care over this in Season 2, as Sara threatened to go rogue after Laurel's death. A major theme this season has been Sara's grief, which made the fantasy reunion with Laurel oh-so satisfying in the finale. Ultimately, the success of the Legends' mission came down to Sara, who casually depowered the Spear and resisted her urge to kill Damian Darhk. And I'm sure I wasn't the only viewer who cheered when she punched him out.

A Team Of Outcasts & Misfits

But it's not all about Sara. One of the reasons Legends of Tomorrow succeeded in Season 2 was because they developed the team dynamic, pairing the characters off in alternating couples but still focusing on the relationships that made sense. Stein and Jax had some great moments this season, especially in the fantastic episode "Abominations", which examined the merits of altering time to help the downtrodden.

Mick and Amaya were an unexpectedly awesome duo, though the Justice Society alumni was later paired off with Nate (an initially obnoxious addition to the team, but one I eventually warmed to). After being far too preachy and holier-than-thou last season, Ray was appropriately adorkable in Season 2, while we saw another, darker (and kinda sexier?) side to Rip when he joined the Legion of Doom. Each character was nicely developed, but none more so than Mick.

Mick Rory is constantly underestimated and insulted. [Credit: The CW]
Mick Rory is constantly underestimated and insulted. [Credit: The CW]

Mick Rory is perhaps the most interesting character on Legends of Tomorrow, and that's partly because the team think he's the least interesting among them. Constantly underestimated, misjudged, and insulted right to his face, Mick has had a chip on his shoulder since day one, and rightly so. Season 1 contrasted Mick's kleptomania with Leonard Snart's budding heroism, putting the two at odds more than once. Season 2 asked the question of who Mick is without Leonard, and the answer was surprising — he's a big damn hero too, but still a kleptomaniac.

Mick's morality was consistently questioned throughout Season 2, and manipulated by the Legion of Doom he eventually betrayed the team — though this, I would argue, was fairly justified, as its not like the Legends ever treated him like a friend. In the penultimate episode, "Doomworld", it was up to Mick to assemble the Legends and save the day, which proved his worth as a character. Here's hoping that in Season 3 the team finally appreciate his quirks rather than constantly putting him down.

Sara seduces Camelot's Guinevere, because she's just that good. [Credit: The CW]
Sara seduces Camelot's Guinevere, because she's just that good. [Credit: The CW]

Season 2 really was an exploration of the core elements of Legends of Tomorrow, and by comparing them to both the Legion of Doom and the Justice Society the show explained why these outcasts work as a team. It was also interesting to see the Legends follow, then break their self-imposed time travel rules, and their romps through the timeline were consistently entertaining — especially Sara's personal mission to seduce every willing woman in history.

Episodes like "The Fellowship of the Spear", "Moonshot", and "Raiders of the Lost Art" were really Legends at its best, with exciting plots and Easter Egg-laden dialogue, as the team tried to protect history without changing it. This season has really followed through on all Legends' storytelling potential. While The Flash is weighed down by angst and repetitive plots, Supergirl falters, and Arrow fails to thrill, the best Arrowverse show might just be the one we least expected. Roll on Season 3!

Tell us in the comments: What did you like about Legends of Tomorrow Season 2?

A family Thanksgiving dinner. [Credit: The CW]
A family Thanksgiving dinner. [Credit: The CW]

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