ByKit Simpson Browne, writer at Creators.co
Writer-at-large. Bad jokes aplenty. Can be gently prodded on Twitter at @kitsb1
Kit Simpson Browne

Now, in a world already so full of hate, division and willfully unbridled anger, you might think that no level of petty threat-slinging would still be able to come as a surprise. After all, we've all long since grown accustomed to folks on the internet screaming at one another, and even to that screaming to mutate into threats of violence in the real world. The very idea of "doxxing" — the publishing of personal information about a person online as a form of harassment or vigilante "justice" — may seem absurd and morally compromised, but to a small sub-section of the internet (and Donald Trump) it's seen as an entirely reasonable practice.

Which, it seems, is why:

Those Bumbling Oscars Accountants Now Need Bodyguards, Apparently

'La La Land' [Credit: Summit Entertainment]
'La La Land' [Credit: Summit Entertainment]

Specifically, it appears that PricewaterhouseCoopers employees Brian Cullinan and Martha Ruiz may have been receiving death threats online as a result of their involvement in the extremely prominent screw-up during this past Sunday's ceremony. With the pair's actions apparently playing a key role in being announced as the Best Picture winner over (which actually won), some folks on the internet evidently felt that they now deserved to have their personal information published for the whole world to see, as images of their houses reportedly appeared online before too long.

Which, aside from being an absolutely horrifying (and ridiculous) response to two people making a minor error during an awards ceremony, is also the sort of thing that is (entirely legitimately) taken by many to be a threat of physical harm. Which, in turn, perhaps explains why TMZ is now reporting that the pair have been offered additional security by PricewaterhouseCoopers. All because of something nicknamed .

Whether or not the fact that they require such protection is a burning indictment of our society's inability to control its more petty and cruel instincts in the face of mild pop culture controversy, though, is entirely up to you.

What do you think, then? Just how ridiculous is it that screwing up the opening of an envelope could necessitate bodyguards? Let us know below!

Head over to Movie Pilot Video for more Oscars reaction coverage.

(Sources: TMZ)


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