ByJon Miller, writer at Creators.co
A caffeinated commentator obsessed with political pop culture and then writing about it. "Don't talk unless you can improve the silence."
Jon Miller

Here it is! The movie series that made it OK to consider comic book movie adaptations as masterpieces. The Dark Knight series has undoubtedly set a concrete path for the future of the comic book movie genre — an unmercifully dark and gritty saga that incorporates the help of such themes as political and social corruption, tense action sequences, and a deep character study to convey three operatic masterpieces.

In a sense, reinvented the empire of Rome with his series after Joel Schumacher was responsible for its fall with his series. Say what you will about Nolan’s concluding film, The Dark Knight Rises, but there are few people who will deny his talent for bringing out the best story that he could out of a billionaire playboy who dresses as a bat and stalks criminals in the middle of the night.

With that said — a major peccadillo to be found in most Nolan films are one or two plot holes. While the Dark Knight series is phenomenal in every which way, some of those plot holes are pretty distractingly glaring. The inconsistencies themselves could be merely forgivable.

Perhaps Nolan relies to heavily on the eye-candy action scenes and practical effects (he’s one of the few filmmakers that relies less often on CGI and actually blows sh*t up). Are well choreographed set pieces or excellent scenery-chewing dialogue enough to condone some of his less thought-out plot details? It is an interesting concept since his Batman trilogy will never be outdone (at least not anytime soon), so let’s take a long look at some of the most writhing-induced plot hole cliffhangers still bothering us.

'Batman Begins' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'Batman Begins' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

10. John Blake Is Actually Sherlock Holmes

'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

He has known that was Batman this whole time based on a vague look, but, thankfully, he’s kept it to himself. That’s right, kids! If you pay attention, you can be identified by your past and/or alter ego. This is less of a plausible subplot and more of a runtime concern, where we needed to rush Batman’s first appearance in the film and didn’t have enough time for an investigation.

9. R.I.P. Commissioner Gordon

'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

Yeah, wait, what was the reason for this? somehow knew there was going to be an assassination attempt on the Mayor of , faked his own death only to come back onto the screen 15 minutes later. For what? Well, it brings Gordon’s family into the plot — which becomes relevant in the concluding scene, but we could have established character earlier in the film. It just seemed like an element used for two shock values: the death and the return.

8. Surprise Is Only Half The Battle

'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

He knew Gordon was on the frozen lake. He knew Gordon wouldn’t fall into the ice in time. He knew Gordon would grab the flare. He knew Gordon would use it to light up the bridge. And he knew that Bane would see it and get a reaction. Batman is good, but maybe he’s not that good. He could have snuck up behind Bane and pulled the plug on whatever his plan was, but instead he would rather Bane know that he has arrived and prepare himself. Arguably, it is there for Batman to establish hope in the city of Gotham, but still, would you give up surprise over hope?

7. Ra’s Al Ghul Is The Other Guy

'Batman Begins' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'Batman Begins' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

The whole time after his return to Gotham, Bruce Wayne thought he killed the great Ra’s al Ghul in Bhutan. Later, however, he finds out that his trainer, Ducard, was the real and he has a plan to drive Gotham insane. What the point of this deception was I certainly have no idea, but it was effective in reintroducing Liam Neeson into the third act. While that is all well and fine while watching the film, long after it was over you’re kind of left wondering what it’s purpose was.

6. We Don’t Need Water In Gotham

'Batman Begins' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'Batman Begins' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

Dr. Jonathan Crane, A.K.A. Scarecrow, is unstoppable when it comes to his hallucinatory fear drug. It is remarkable how quickly it works. Spraying down Batman, Rachel, Falcone, all of Arkham Asylum’s patients — what ensues is an almost instantaneous hallucinatory nightmare. What’s even more remarkable is how the drug has been dumped into the Gotham water supply for an undisclosed amount of time (although it’s implied that it has been for some time now). What’s even more remarkable is how no one in Gotham has drunk any water, boiled their dinner, or even taken a shower in that amount of time (especially since how instantaneous the opiate is).

5. ‘He’ll Send Every One Of Them,’ Thought Bane

'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

We knew that they were all doomed the second Gordon shouted for every single off and on-duty police officer to fish out and his goons. It was weird since Gordon hadn’t made a stupid decision in his entire tenure, but there went all of Gotham PD’s finest — and there they stayed for five months straight. It was just a little more than mildly interesting how Bane knew that almost all the of the police would be there, assuming that Bane would still be there in the first place.

4. The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Plan

'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

Why was it was a five month-long plan? I guess you could argue that Bane and the League of Shadows wanted the city of Gotham to suffer. Why five months then? Four months is just too short and six months is just too long, I think five months is pretty good. Why did the government not help out with an entire city of citizens held hostage? Bane said he would blow up the city if any Gotham-ite escaped. Could they not come up with a plan in five months though? Such a broad plot hole, so many questions.

3. Welcome Back, Master Wayne!

'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

This one has been played out to no end whatsoever. After predictably escaping the prison, Bruce Wayne somehow manages to break into the most heavily guarded captured city. I’ve heard of the theories — according to The Dark Knight, Wayne Manor is not in the city limits and there are plenty of tunnels, but “it’s just outside the city limits.” One would think that Gotham City and everything around it would be under supervision — how could Wayne sneak in completely undetected and why wouldn’t Batman help the military sneak in?

2. Is That My Car?

'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

is a brilliant engineer. A brilliant inventor. He’s just a genius! He specializes in weapons, vehicles, aircrafts, and all types of defense equipment for Wayne Enterprises, which makes this even more of a plot hole (albeit less Nolan’s fault). I don’t think he invented these products on his own, so he would have to keep his workers and developers unsuspicious; plus, since these things cost money he would need to get approval from board members and keep them unsuspicious.

The point is, with all the ruckus that Batman has been making, it is nothing short of a miracle how people have not realized that he’s been traveling around in Fox’s equipment. Sure, that Coleman Reese guy in The Dark Knight got suspicious, but I doubt he was brilliant enough to be the only person to connect the dots. On a side note — how did the Batcave come to be?

'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight Rises' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

1. I Believe In Harvey Dent

'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]
'The Dark Knight' [Credit: Warner Bros.]

Now, Batman v Superman was a bit unfairly targeted for its rendition of Batman being a killer and all. To be fair, Ben Affleck’s Batman never had that one rule where he stated he would never kill. Christian Bale’s Batman, however, did. Also, the original Batman comic was a man dressed as a bat who ran around shooting people. Bale’s Batman will never kill — he even makes a point of this to the Joker during his interrogation scene. Technically speaking, him not saving Ra’s al Ghul during the train crash made him an accessory to murder, but he deliberately pushed Dent off the ledge. Not that I’m against what he did for plot purposes, but it was never mentioned again by Bruce Wayne.

Can you answer any of these questions for me?


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