ByKatie Granger, writer at Creators.co
MP Staff Writer, come to bargain.
Katie Granger

It's become a running joke amongst comic book fandoms that a who has good relationships with their two living parents is no superhero. From Batman to Captain America, the majority of superheroes either have dead parents, absent parents, or parents with whom they have bad relationships.

This rule applies even more strongly to one of 's most popular heroes, Peter Parker. Spider-Man's origin story is all wrapped up in the trauma of watching his father-figure Uncle Ben shot and killed in an instance that he could have prevented. From this we were gifted great power and great responsibility, and Spider-Man got his strict moral code.

What a terrible man [Credit: Marvel Comics]
What a terrible man [Credit: Marvel Comics]

It's also a running joke in the fandoms that we really, really don't need to see Spider-Man's origin story again. We've already seen it twice in live-action thanks to Sony Pictures, and anyone with even a passing knowledge of likely knows the story already. Thankfully, Captain America: Civil War skipped over the whole retelling, covering it in a mere few lines.

But regardless, daddy issues are still a core part of the character, as with his Marvel Cinematic Universe buddy, Iron Man. The lack of parents and then loss of the male guiding hand, and the weakness felt in his inability to stop it, this all forms a key part of Peter Parker's motivations and what makes Spider-Man, Spider-Man.

That and the fact that he talks a lot of nonsense [Credit: Marvel Comics]
That and the fact that he talks a lot of nonsense [Credit: Marvel Comics]

See also:

The upcoming Spider-Man: Homecoming takes place some time after the death of Ben Parker, and brings together Peter Parker and Tony Stark in a weird, kinda-parental-but-kinda-not-really relationship.

[Credit: Marvel Studios]
[Credit: Marvel Studios]

And this relationship has already captured the imaginations of fans the world over. Enter ArtingGrace, illustrator, designer, story and comic artist, who posted some super adorable Tony and Peter fan art on her Twitter.

Grace's fanart charts an imagined (but in our opinion now totally canon) relationship between the two characters, from right back at the beginning of the .

'Iron Man' (2008)

[Credit: ArtingGrace via Twitter]
[Credit: ArtingGrace via Twitter]

A 5-year old Peter gazes adoringly at Tony Stark when he announces to the world that he is Iron Man. Note the Iron Man-esque robot he's clutching, it's too cute.

'The Avengers' (2012)

[Credit: ArtingGrace via Twitter]
[Credit: ArtingGrace via Twitter]

A 9-year old Peter looks on in fear and amazement as Iron Man fights the invading Chitauri forces during the Battle of New York in The Avengers. Now he's upgraded to a more refined Iron Man action figure (still too cute).

'Spider-Man: Homecoming' (2017)

[Credit: ArtingGrace via Twitter]
[Credit: ArtingGrace via Twitter]

And fast-forward to now. 15 years old and already a superhero, Spider-Man and Iron Man clash in an altercation taken from the new trailer, and Peter sits cradling the same Iron Man action figure, contemplating the meaning of Tony's words.

While Iron Man may be the one Spidey looked up to, Spider-Man is the one that kids everywhere will look up to now. That's why he’s so important, and that's why we can't wait to see him swing into action. Thankfully we don't have to wait much longer, as Spider-Man: Homecoming releases July 7, 2017 in the US.

What are you most excited to see in Spider-Man: Homecoming? Tell us in the comments, and check out the new trailer below!

(Source: ArtingGrace via Twitter)

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