ByEleanor Tremeer, writer at Creators.co
MP staff. I talk about Star Wars a lot. Sometimes I'm paid for it. More ramblings on Twitter @ExtraTremeerial
Eleanor Tremeer

In case it hasn't been obvious from how I've been singing Supergirl's praises recently, I love the show. Sure, it's not perfect, but Season 2 has gone a long way to fixing the problems that riddled Season 1 — the introduction of new characters like the adorable Mon-El and resident badass Maggie Sawyer really revitalized the show, and by focusing on compelling themes of oppression and ostracization Supergirl has really found its niche.

Having said that, there are some niggly details the show needs to sort out. And although this week's episode, the ironically titled "We Can Be Heroes", had some very strong moments, there are some plot holes that just can't be ignored.

Kara takes a hard stance in "We Can Be Heroes". [Credit: The CW]
Kara takes a hard stance in "We Can Be Heroes". [Credit: The CW]

In Season 2 Episode 10, Kara again confronts her apparent "nemesis", the cackling, crackling Livewire. The villain's third appearance is possibly her best yet as it feels the most natural, and the twist that Livewire was in fact the victim of the tale opened up a really interesting dialogue between her and Kara.

In the meantime, both Mon-El and James continued their quest to become heroes of their own, with varying degrees of non-success. And although this was a much-needed development of the Guardian plot, "We Can Be Heroes" brought to light some of the most annoying plot holes.

Kara's Inexplicably Hard Stance Against Guardian

Don't get me wrong, this isn't a bad episode of Supergirl Season 2, but it introduces a plot thread that just doesn't feel right for a few reasons. In "We Can Be Heroes", Kara finally discovers that James is Guardian, and she doesn't react well. Despite James (and Mon-El) desperately trying to prove themselves to her, Kara inevitably has to save them in the final battle, which seems to only reinforce her strange prejudice — that only superpowered people can be heroes.

Kara doesn't feel James should become Guardian. [Credit: The CW]
Kara doesn't feel James should become Guardian. [Credit: The CW]

Which... what? While it makes sense that Kara would be afraid for James and Winn's safety, the root of her argument against them being active in fighting crime isn't just flawed, it lacks continuity with her own character development.

Let's take our minds back to last December, when The CW launched one of TV's biggest crossover events — the awesome multi-episode arc entitled "Invasion!", when Kara crossed over to Earth-1 to team up with her fellow heroes against the Dominators. And crucially, not all those heroes had superpowers.

"That's what you've all proven here! Metahuman or not, superpowers or not — you are Earth's mightiest heroes."

Supergirl's incredible abilities were an interesting feature of the "Invasion!" arc, as Kara helped to train the other heroes. A major theme of these episodes was that superpowered heroes were not superior to non-powered heroes, and the final fight scene made excellent use of everyone's unique abilities. Kara herself made several comments on this, finally telling Oliver and Barry that it didn't matter whether heroes had powers or not.

And yet, a mere month or so later, Kara tells James that he can't be a hero because he doesn't have powers. Okay.

"We are not the same. You are a human. You're going to get yourself killed. One mistake, one human error, and you're gone, that's it. You don't get a strike, James, not like me."

Kara tells James he's too human to be a hero. [Credit: The CW]
Kara tells James he's too human to be a hero. [Credit: The CW]

Admittedly, Kara's reaction to Guardian's unmasking also has a lot to do with the fact that she hasn't liked the shadowy vigilante from the get-go, thanks to how he operated without liaising with National City PD or the DEO. Yet, Superman also operates as an independent vigilante (as far as we know). And as Kara spits out the word "human", underlining all her criticisms of James' heroism with the fact that he doesn't have superpowers, all of her arguments fall apart.

This seems to lie on Kara's prejudice, which is a nice ironic counter to the show's message of inclusivity and accepting both aliens and humans. So really, there's nothing wrong with Kara having complaints against Guardian — it's nice for such an apparently cute and bubbly protagonist to have an edge. The problem is that Kara has already worked with non-powered heroes, and this doesn't just feel like a backwards step for her character development, it flat out doesn't make any sense.

Kara fights alongside non-powered heroes in "Invasion!" [Credit: The CW]
Kara fights alongside non-powered heroes in "Invasion!" [Credit: The CW]

Why would Kara accept White Canary and Green Arrow and all the other human heroes of Earth-1, but not her trusted friend James? Hopefully, Supergirl will provide an answer for this, as otherwise it's just a plot hole. And speaking of which...

Who Is Running Cat-Co?

After Cat Grant's strong presence in Supergirl Season 1, we all knew that trying to compensate for the loss of actress Calista Flockheart would be one of the challenges of Season 2. James Olsen was put in charge of Cat-Co Worldwide Media, which seemed to be an interesting step up for his character. And yet, although early episodes in this season touched on a rivalry between James and editorial chief Snapper Carr, as the season wore on James has been spending less and less time managing the company. Which, again, makes no sense.

James runs Cat-Co... technically. [Credit: The CW]
James runs Cat-Co... technically. [Credit: The CW]

If there's anything that was obvious from Cat's portrayal in Season 1, it's that running Cat-Co is a really, really tough job that demands almost every minute of your time. Cat's frenetic energy and dedication to quality was what kept her company afloat, and she needed all the help Kara could give her, challenging her young assistant to be just as driven as she was. And yet, James seems to be content to let the company flounder without him.

Ok, we haven't seen a lot of James handling his new career this season, and it could be that a lot of his work is happening offscreen. But the few moments we do see him at the helm of Cat-Co it's a brief flash before he runs off to save the day as Guardian — this was particularly obvious in "We Could Be Heroes", when Kara noticed a section of Cat-Co reporting on Livewire's jailbreak. During Cat Grant's reign, such a big story would demand her immediate attention, as she directed her staff to report on the incident. James, however, took this as his cue to abandon Cat-Co and become Guardian instead.

James as Guardian. [Credit: The CW]
James as Guardian. [Credit: The CW]

This isn't a criticism of James becoming Guardian. It's an interesting change for his character. The problem is that the show already gave him a new role, and with how this role of running Cat-Co was set by Season 1, it just doesn't make sense for James to split his time between his job and being Guardian.

Here's hoping that this is also dealt with soon, because Cat-Co was such a strong presence in Season 1, and right now James seems to care very little for the company Cat Grant entrusted him to run.

Tell us in the comments: Are these plot holes or just nit-picky complaints?

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