ByNya, writer at Creators.co
Incurable Geek. Blogger at www.louderthansilver.com. Tweet me @weareLTS
Nya

Although the comics featuring Archie Andrews started in the 1940s, the art and style have changed over the years to stay current with the times. From the introduction of an openly gay character named Kevin Keller to Archie's wedding, there have been many major turning points throughout Archie's history. Afterlife with Archie even featured a zombie apocalypse and the actual death of Archie!

Archie in Golden Age's Pep Comics, the comic series that introduced us to Archie. [Credit: Archie Comics]
Archie in Golden Age's Pep Comics, the comic series that introduced us to Archie. [Credit: Archie Comics]

Although we might barely recognize Archie in Riverdale, many fans will know that this is not the first time Archie and friends have gone through some major changes.

Veronica, Archie and Betty, as most of us remember them. [Credit: Archie Comics]
Veronica, Archie and Betty, as most of us remember them. [Credit: Archie Comics]
With the all-new Archie's relaunch in 2015, we get more realistic characters and an updated look. [Credit: Archie Comics]
With the all-new Archie's relaunch in 2015, we get more realistic characters and an updated look. [Credit: Archie Comics]

Jon Goldwater, Archie Comics CEO, is the first to confirm in his introduction in Road to Riverdale that even though the characters in the TV show might not be identical, the feeling, the tone and vibe are completely in sync. With Road to Riverdale, readers might gain a more clear understanding of the comics that inspired the Netflix show by accessing a compilation of the all-new series, including Archie, Jughead, Betty and Veronica, Josie and the Pussycats, and Reggie & Me, featuring writers and artists like Mark Waid, Adam Hughes, Marguerite Bennett, Fiona Staples and Chip Zdarsky.

5. 'Archie #1'

[Credit: Archie Comics]
[Credit: Archie Comics]

With the first issue of the all-new Archie reboot, we already get to see a much more complex and less cartoonish Archie Andrews. Gone are the light and fun drama conflicts that made Archie so popular. This issue bring a dose of realism that, though unfamiliar, works. Archie as portrayed here has thoughts of his own and is many steps closer to what we can expect on the TV show. The main difference is that the comics are still an all-ages series targeted to teenagers, while the Netflix version is a pretty twisted tale.

4. 'Jughead #1'

[Credit: Archie Comics]
[Credit: Archie Comics]

Archie's best friend and king of burgers had his own all-new relaunch, too. To counter balance the heavier Archie reboot, Jughead #1 brings comic relief back to the series with a dilemma that has nothing to do with the typical teenage drama. Jughead's concern is actually food.

Funny, bright, colorful, and focused on Jughead, this series was the next step in making Jughead more central, have his own role and be less of a sidekick.

3. 'Betty & Veronica #1'

[Credit: Archie Comics]
[Credit: Archie Comics]

There's life beyond Archie! I think the main point of this series by Adam Hughes is to expand upon Betty and Veronica's friendship, fights and lives independent of Archie. The art and style are striking and mature, and the whole vibe is updated. There's no romance with Archie in Betty & Veronica #1, giving an opportunity for both girls to develop personalities of their own and have other issues (and fights) to care about. That's another aspect from the new comics that seems to have inspired the TV show.

2. 'Josie And The Pussycats #1'

[Credit: Archie Comics]
[Credit: Archie Comics]

The world's most famous fictitious rock band has finally starred in their own comic series with their first all-new issue. Now that they have their own spotlight, their recurring presence in the Netflix's show is only logical. Apart from that, the band's history, appearance and personal issues are quite different from the Netflix's portrayal. I loved this first issue and prefer their story in the comics — a refreshing take on Josie and the Pussycats that's very welcome. Toying with the idea of a romance between Val and Archie is not new either, as this has already been done on Archies and Josie and the Pussycats, The (Archie & Friends All-Stars).

The appearance changes, the friendship remains. 'Riverdale' [Credit: Warner Bros. TV]
The appearance changes, the friendship remains. 'Riverdale' [Credit: Warner Bros. TV]

1. 'Reggie And Me #1'

[Credit: Archie Comics]
[Credit: Archie Comics]

Though bad boy Reggie had his own series with the all-new reboot, we can't say he's nearly as prominent on the actual TV show (so far, at least). However, there's a particular side of Reggie's personality that shone through this series — narrated by his best friend, his dog — that followed through in the TV version: his human side.

While the tone and storylines are very unique from the comics, you'll notice that everything you love about the characters remain the same. — 'Road to Riverdale'

If you have been wondering why the TV show differs so much from the old comics, then this might have given you some answers.

With the release of Road to Riverdale, Archie Comics have confirmed how the all-new Archie reboot was part of their new vision of Riverdale. Their aim was to keep the characters' essence and personalities while revamping their vibe to match a more modern setting and reach a larger audience.

This led to the opportunity of starring the Archie universe in the TV drama you now know as . While the all-new series targeted both kids and adults alike, we can't say the same about the TV show — that is everything but kids-orientated. The twisted non-traditional approach has surely divided the fans and newcomers.

Are you watching Riverdale? What are you enjoying most about the Netflix revamp of Archie and his friends?

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