ByAllanah Faherty, writer at Creators.co
Senior staff writer | Twitter: @allanahfaherty | Email: [email protected]
Allanah Faherty

There are not many shows you can watch episode after episode and honestly say that your brain was 100% challenged by what you saw, but that's exactly what 's Westworld did to us for 10 straight weeks.

We expected a lot from : brilliant acting, a beautiful setting and a gripping story. However, I doubt anyone expected such an intricate and thought-provoking series, one that took us to both the future and the past and had us scrambling to collect our thoughts following the end of each hour.

Ford and Bernard shake hands as friends [HBO]
Ford and Bernard shake hands as friends [HBO]

Season 1 of Westworld might now be at an end, but I have no doubt that many viewers will be rewatching the series in order to spot the tiny moments of foreshadowing, and to further wrap our heads around the twist and turns of the plot. But before you launch back into a rewatch take a look below at the five things you might have missed from Westworld, Episode 10 "The Bicameral Mind."

1. William is the Man in Black, the Man in Black is William

William is.... William [HBO]
William is.... William [HBO]

The longest and most enduring theory through the first season of Westworld has to have been that William was a younger version of the Man in Black. And luckily for us, the season finale didn't waste much time putting us theorists out of misery when it pulled all the loose ends into a tidy bow, and it confirmed the theory with a beautiful transformation scene.

Basically, for anyone still struggling to get their heads around the different time frames (and no judgement, that shit was confusing!), for the entire season we've been seeing the story of William's very first foray into the park as well as his very last one.

Logan and William in Westworld Ep 10 [HBO]
Logan and William in Westworld Ep 10 [HBO]

During his first time in Westworld he was about to marry Logan's sister, Juliet, though soon fell in love with Dolores. Then Dolores and Westworld drove him a bit nuts and he began killing scores of hosts, culminating in him essentially sentencing his brother-in-law-to-be to death when he set Logan off, bound and naked on the back of a horse. Because we know that the Man in Black (older William) owns the majority shares in Westworld, we can assumed that Logan either died in the park, or soon bowed out of his family's business, allowing William to take over from his father-in-law.

Stoked [HBO]
Stoked [HBO]

All of the scenes with the older William (a.k.a the Man in Black) have been him trying to solve what he believed was the final level of Westworld (the maze) only to find out that it was never for him in the first place. But, ultimately he ended up at peace when he saw that the hosts were fighting back for themselves, and (presumably) died with his goals fulfilled.

2. Westworld was basically confirmed as an island

Maeve sees her narrative [HBO]
Maeve sees her narrative [HBO]

We've read a whole host of theories on Westworld over the past 10 weeks, and one of the big questions was where exactly was the park located? There were some interesting theories including an abandoned post-apocalyptic town or city, underwater or even space, though in the end it seems it was the most likely answer: an island.

When Bernard was explaining to Maeve that she wasn't the only one making the decisions, it was simply a new narrative she was following, we got a glimpse at the control panel. There we saw that her narrative directed her to "deceive," then "coerce," then "recruit," then "escape" with the ultimate goal being "mainland infiltration." Bernard even begins to tell Maeve her narrative ends with "mainland infiltration" when she swiftly cuts him off. This would also explain why Westworld is able to have an ocean — a feat that otherwise would would have been a huge undertaking and that would've likely come off looking a little like The Truman Show scenery.

3. We finally got to see... Samurai/Shōgun World?!

Armistice enters the Samurai World behavioral labs [HBO]
Armistice enters the Samurai World behavioral labs [HBO]

Anyone who knows anything about Westworld knows that before it was a TV series it was a film, and in that film not only was there a West World theme park, but also Roman World and Medieval World. Even since the TV series began, fans have been asking show creators Jonathon Nolan and Lisa Joy whether the other worlds might make an appearance, and in the finale we got our answer — well, sort of. While we didn't see Roman World or Medieval World, we were very briefly introduced to Samurai/Shōgun World! Interestingly there were actually Samurai hosts in the sequel to the original Westworld movie, titled Futureworld.

We only got a brief look at the Samurai, but suffice to say it all looked amazing and there's no doubt that we'll see more of this new world in Westworld Season 2.

Samurai practice fighting in Westworld Episode 10 [HBO]
Samurai practice fighting in Westworld Episode 10 [HBO]

But while we didn't see a hint of Roman or Medieval Worlds, that's not to say they don't exist and actually the fact that Felix's note to Maeve was so number based ("Park 1 Sector 15 Zone 3") seems to hint that there were probably several parks. After all, if there were just Westworld and Samurai World, surely they would have just been referred to by their names, or even initials like they are in the logos?

See also:

4. Surprise! Ford was pro-host all along

Ford [John P. Johnson/HBO]
Ford [John P. Johnson/HBO]

We thought him nothing more than a cold creator for weeks and then BAM, in the final episode it turns out that Ford was actually on the side of the hosts all along.

It turns out that following Arnold's death, Ford came around to his partner's thinking and began playing a long game. While Arnold was content with hosts reaching consciousness and becoming "alive," Ford was more interested in having the hosts actually interact with humans, and collecting memories of suffering in order to give them a reason not to trust humans, to give them "time to understand their enemy." In return this meant that the hosts would become legitimate threats and opponents of humans — something that we saw was very much achieved with the whole Maeve-escape scene, as well as the final scene inside the park.

Ford's final toast [HBO]
Ford's final toast [HBO]

Ford's overall goal explains why he spoke to the hosts in the manner he did, preparing them not to believe what a human said or did, and why he had his employees treat the hosts the way they did. Having employees do things such as performing analysis on hosts while they were naked — essentially stripping all their dignity away — gave hosts few reasons to ever feel remorse for eventually revolting against humans.

5. There was a post-credits scene!

Armistice had no interested in an armistice [HBO]
Armistice had no interested in an armistice [HBO]

Yep, post-credits scenes aren't just reserved for movies these days, they also show up in top shelf TV series! Right when you thought that Armistice was doomed to be crushed in the security door inside the Samurai World labs and shot to pieces by Delos employees, a post-credits scene seems to imply this pocket rocket might just make out it alive, albeit one arm down.

Armistice cuts herself free like the bad bitch she is [HBO]
Armistice cuts herself free like the bad bitch she is [HBO]

The post-credits scene showed Armistice cutting herself loose in a scene straight out of 127 Hours, and facing a nervous-looking Delos employee who quickly found that despite his wishes, this bad host was about to "cease all motor functions" for no man. The scene ended with Armistice giving a sort of grimace and heading toward the guard. So will we see her again in Season 2? Only time will tell, but I certainly hope so.

Bonus: That picture was a stock image!

The image of Juliet in Westworld [HBO]
The image of Juliet in Westworld [HBO]

Nope, this wasn't technically something in the show (though we did learn how the picture of Juliet ended up on the Abernathy farm), however the detectives on Reddit did discover that that picture of Logan's sister and William's fiancée, Juliet was a stock image. And, what's even funnier is that the photographer's last name is Weber, just like Arnold!

While this was likely just an image that the props department found appropriate for the role, given that Westworld creator Jonathan Nolan is the brother of director, Christopher Nolan ,some are theorizing this might just be.... Inception.

Westworld will return to HBO with Season 2 at a yet-to-be-confirmed date.

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