BySarah Gibson, writer at Creators.co
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Sarah Gibson

A screen adaptation of Donna Tartt's bestselling novel The Goldfinch is on the way after the producers behind The Hunger Games announced that they will be making a movie adaptation.

The Wrap is reporting that the book, which was was selected as one of the 10 Best Books of 2013 by the editors of the New York Times Book Review, will be produced by the same guys behind all four Hunger Games flicks. Nina Jacobsen, one of the film execs behind Katniss and her pals revealed that:

We are looking for the right film-maker, and then we'll choose the right home based on that film-maker ... With a piece of material this great, there are a lot of conversations to be had.

The Goldfinch, Tartt's third novel and her first since 2002's The Little Friend, is about a 13-year-old boy who survives an art-gallery bombing that kills his mother. Here's the official synopsis:

Aged thirteen, Theo Decker, son of a devoted mother and a reckless, largely absent father, survives an accident that otherwise tears his life apart. Alone and rudderless in New York, he is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. He is tormented by an unbearable longing for his mother, and down the years clings to the thing that most reminds him of her: a small, strangely captivating painting that ultimately draws him into the criminal underworld. As he grows up, Theo learns to glide between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love - and his talisman, the painting, places him at the centre of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle.
The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling power. Combining unforgettably vivid characters and thrilling suspense, it is a beautiful, addictive triumph - a sweeping story of loss and obsession, of survival and self-invention, of the deepest mysteries of love, identity and fate.

No details have emerged of any directors or actors who may be under consideration and we still don't know whether The Goldfinch will be aimed at the big or small screen. Personally, I can't see The Goldfinch being a cinema movie. It's too sprawling. My bet's on HBO or Showtime airing it as a miniseries which would do it more justice.

Don't hold your breath, though! The rights to Tartt's The Secret History were sold years ago and that film has yet to see the light of day. What do you guys think? Excited by the idea of the Hunger Games producers sinking their teeth into another movie project? Sound off below!

(Source: TheWrap)

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