BySarah Gibson, writer at Creators.co
Follow @sarahmoviepilot
Sarah Gibson

Aaah, the age of remakes. Being a bit of a skeptic of all things corporate, I realize that many horror movies coming out of Hollywood these days are rebooted classics, CGI'd to death and given the 3D treatment - and this trend looks like it's here to stay. Last year we had Carrie, Evil Dead, and Texas Chainsaw 3D. Now we're looking at Hellraiser, Friday the 13th, Child's Play... And The Shining prequel, to boot!

With that said, only one question remains: Which classic horror movies would you still like to see rebooted? Here are my five suggestions...


Cujo, 1983

Stephen King's huge, slobbering, seemingly unstoppable dog - with only the vaguest hint of any supernatural aspects - still leaves me wondering how Beethoven ever got off the ground nine years later. When this family hound went poking his nose into caves, he got bitten by a bat and, appropriately, went batsh*t crazy.

Sure, they'd need to set this reboot in the time it was written. Because these days, who doesn't have an iPhone now; Donna and her son wouldn't have to wait a week before somebody found them... That said, the novel upon which Cujo was based has a simple but effective premise, and if the remake was done right, then there's buckets of potential for some damn good monster horror.

Let's let Cujo bite back...

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The Island of Dr. Moreau, 1977

Okay, so the evolutionary scarefest about a scientist caught up in experiments to "humanize" nature was also done in 1932 with Island of Lost Souls, and again in 1996, with Marlon Brando as the man who creates multiple animal men by performing his surgeries on beasts while they're still alive. But, given the h̶o̶r̶r̶i̶f̶y̶i̶n̶g̶ awesome premise from H.G. Wells, I think it's about time we gave Dr. Moreau and his gang another whirl.

Oh yeah...and we can work out the topic of whether or not it's ethical as we go along. That's easy. Just show me a freaky, f*cked-up film and I'm good.

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Freaks, 1932

Far beyond bad taste, and far, far, far beyond political correctness, Tod Browning's long-banned classic of 1932, Freaks, would be waaaay offensive to remake in this day and age.

Although the flick is jam-packed full of pathos - serving up premonitions of eugenics and the freakish nature of showbiz - this is one movie reboot that will probably never see the light of day. Hollywood knows it would be toxic. Still, as someone who gets their kicks from the shock value of most horror movies, I often find myself musing over how they'd do it...

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Slumber Party Massacre, 1982

Seemingly playing to the fantasies of teenage boys and horror-hounds alike, The Slumber Party Massacre basically does what it says on the tin: slumber parties and massacre. Oh, and plenty of carnal urges and a fat helping of cringe on the side.

For a pretty straightforward slasher, it's most definitely one of the most memorable. By today's standards, it would also be considered rather campy, so a spoof horror wouldn't be wholly out of the question. Not to mention a shiny new two-handed industrial piece of machinery capable of some gruesome renovations of girls' faces, just to spice things up a bit!

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They Live, 1988

John Carpenter toyed - terrifyingly - with the idea that alien forces control our media, making subliminal use of billboards, commercials and magazines to subvert our thinking. The idea of a secret agenda being pushed right under our noses is just as relevant today as it was in 1988 - we need those bullshit-detecting sunglasses now more than ever!

Imagine seeing 2014's social elite through those lenses, becoming skeleton-faced ghouls with soulless metallic eyes and hearing that "bubblegum" line from the original... Poetry, man.

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Poll

So, let's hear it: Which horror movie classic do you want rebooted?


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