ByNicko Nickoo, writer at Creators.co
Nicko Nickoo

As we all know, The Walking Dead is a television drama based on a comic series by Robert Kirkman. The foundation is a zombie (walker) apocalypse leaving the characters to fight for continued existence, generate new social circles, and adapt to a new way of life. With Rick and the group comes under a constant bombardment of threats from walkers, hunger, and physical and emotional wounds, the show continues to fascinate and keep my interest.

In The Walking Dead, Rick and the group make choices they would never have imagined in a pre-apocalypse time. Numerous times they have to make choices between survival and what they once considered the “right” or ethical decision, hence leaving them with feelings of internal chaos.

In season four, we found out Carol stabbed and burned Karen/David to save the group from contracting a likely deadly illness. Rick asked/told her to leave the group, believing she had crossed a line and was no longer making decisions he considered ethical or fair. What did you think about this decision? I have come to the conclusion that none of us really know what kind of human being we would be in a life as distressing as that depicted on The Walking Dead. Rick and group have a psychological conflict everyday because it’s about having a desire to live but yet they realize death is inevitable. Death is all around and recurring, however the group continues to show such a strong will to live and protect the ones in the group/surrogate family.

Even though it may be impossible for the dead to walk the earth, The Walking Dead portrays real life situations. Such as PTSD, psychoses, personality changes, obsession, grief, and even alcoholism (Bob a new character risked his life and the group’s well being for his yearning for alcohol).

In season two, we even saw a form of narcissism and anti-social personality in Shane, who ended up trying to kill his best friend (Rick). The writers/producers provided a unique insight into the show in the terms of power. For instance.. “Shane was perfectly fine as long as no one questioned his direction, “He (Shane) felt like anybody who questioned his direction was criticizing him as a individual, which is what you find in people who are narcissists.”

Shane fights in The Walking Dead
Shane fights in The Walking Dead

[The Walking Dead](series:201193) writers/producers do an amazing job of demonstrating social psychology and group dynamics. Think about it, becoming part of a strong group is necessary for one’s survival during zombie apocalypse, in spite of that members have little choice in who they end up with in a survival group, since most of their friends and family have become walkers, died or scattered elsewhere. It was interesting to see how Rick was chosen as the leader after he arrived at the campsite and the difficult decisions Rick was forced to make.

In The Walking Dead, there are a great number of group dynamics between various groups. The Governor's group (Woodbury) was automatically suspicious of Rick’s group and sought to eradicate them. Even though one and all are in the same situation, the groups still find reason to fear each other rather than working together. There are many social psychology hypothesizes, as in the distressing mental state that folks feel when they find themselves doing things that don’t fit with what they know, or have opinions that do not fit with other opinions they hold.

Rearing children during a zombie-apocalypse is difficult. The children in The Walking Dead are compelled to deal with adult issues (death, violence, starvation, and trauma. As parents Rick and Lori had a difficult time, because to raise Carl in a walker world you must teach him how to defend himself, yet still encourage him to be a kid. Do you try to educate them on reading and math? Or about using knives and guns? Those questions were answered by Carol by teaching them about survival and how to handle guns/knives in the prison library. Carl, Lizzie and Mika were no longer the kids Rick or Carol wanted them to remain. Season four Carl abstain from carrying a gun but in the end Carl takes on adult responsibilities due to adult situations of coming under attack from the Governor.

I take no prisoners.....
I take no prisoners.....

The truth of the matter is regardless, I can’t get enough of the set of clothes, makeup, set, and camera work in this awesome show. The walkers are exceptionally depicted, looking more in shreds, filthy, and damaged in season four than they did in season one. As time passes without civilization, the world around reflects the undeniable toll of nature and conflict.

Zombies are everywhere
Zombies are everywhere

The difference in seeing this in a cinema is that I have observed this passage of time over a period of many months according to the story-line, rather than a two-hour screening. Seeing these changes in Rick’s group and walkers encourages my imagination of what our own cities and roads and buildings would look like following the end of civilization. I adore The Walking Dead due to the phenomenal theatrics, character evolution and intrapersonal conflict with Rick and the group.

As always feedback is welcome in my neck of the woods

My neck of the woods
My neck of the woods

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