ByNicko Nickoo, writer at Creators.co
Nicko Nickoo

We've had months to, digest, season four of [The Walking Dead](series:201193). So, what do we think so far? There is a huge amount of speculation about Terminus/Termites and the season to come. Heck, I have made my own predictions/speculations about season five…all in all I just want season five to begin. Is it October yet?

The Walking Dead for four seasons has had thematic elements which makes the outlandish premise believable. Without a doubt I and maybe many, respect the tangled nuances of the characters' more and more multifaceted options and motivations. We understand that making the "best decision" is dishonestly not a dichotomous issue despite the seemingly clear-cut world of a zombie/walker/biter plague world. This is all the more remarkable given the simple rules:

Walkers could be anywhere at any time. You therefore need to avoid walkers when you can and kill them when you have to. Walkers will tear into your flesh and eat you if you run into them.

Those rules are concrete, but like all morality stories, (as in High Noon) moral vagueness is plainly displayed in seemingly straightforward conditions. I don't mean that these alternatives are simple. I just think that if you enjoy the show, you really can't sit there in your lounge chair or on your sofa, watch and not find yourself speculating what you would do in spite of the clearly demarcated playing field.

For example, Should Shane have killed Otis? Should walkers be kept alive in Hershel’s barn? Should those walkers, once set free of the barn, be killed? In other words, you can't watch the show without putting yourself in the characters' boots because no one seems to wear shoes, and that is key to darn awesome drama. It keeps it, genuine.

We get reasonably drawn into what can only be called a kind of zombie/walker/biter verisimilitude. It's one thing to ponder Gary Cooper's dilemmas in High Noon. Those are real and believable bad guys that he's up against. But in The Walking Dead, we're talking zombies/walkers/biters, and still I've had coworkers at work who think out loud during lunch about how they would individually handle the chaotic ambiguities that walkers bring to the agenda.

High Noon
High Noon

In a world of zombie movies where the major premise seems nothing more than the utter joy of shooting/knifing senseless wandering walkers/biters to pieces, The Walking Dead instead use the dead to make you stop and think is quite an odd triumph. Not since Battlestar Galactica, in my opinion have moral questions been so eagerly and cautiously presented in such an unusual environment. The Walking Dead uses these moral questions as a means for exploring the diverse ways we humans react to terror. Because of this aspect of the show in and of itself holds considerable worth.

 RICKTATOR !
RICKTATOR !

Watch The Walking Dead Season 4 trailer online here!

The Walking Dead serves as a token that one individual’s maladaptive response to the experience of horror might be the key to remaining psychologically whole for somebody else. Responses are unique to the individuals, and in some cases we can get ourselves into trouble if we consider a "one-size-fits-all attitude" for what we consider pathologic. For example, ask yourself this question: Was Shane/Governor always the dark guys they became? Were the men always utilitarian killers? Was it their uniquely personal and hard-wired response to the events unfolding, or the result of changes to their brains as a consequence of the world they once knew gone?

Burning
Burning

I’d like to conclude by noting that the walkers have strangely gotten more dexterous and clever. I hope that the writers/producers do not succumb to the alarm bell scream of the fast moving walkers. I think blundering brain-dead humans, after all, shouldn't even begin to open closed bathroom door of RIP, Dale’s Winnebago. Or the walkers taking a big rock and hitting the glass doors. So please…..do this for me, writers/producers of The Walking Dead, keep the walkers slow. That was Romero's vision, and that image lends itself best to the sly complexity of walkers. That's how things stay remarkable and sneaky. Make walkers move as if they are trudging through country syrup. Make them walking metaphors for the sticky decisions that the humans among them must daily face. That'll keep the show going for years.

Andrea
Andrea
I'm going to get  (eat) you my dear....
I'm going to get (eat) you my dear....

As always feedback is welcome in my neck of the woods

My neck of the woods....
My neck of the woods....

Latest from our Creators