ByKit Simpson Browne, writer at Creators.co
Writer-at-large. Bad jokes aplenty. Can be gently prodded on Twitter at @kitsb1
Kit Simpson Browne

When, earlier this week, news broke that Warner Bros. had registered a very particular set of domain names, the internet went a little...enthusiastic.

After all, they were AquamanMovie.com, JusticeLeagueFilm.com, ShazamMovie.com, and WonderWomanTheMovie.com, which would - if true - confirm the upcoming lineup of DC comic book movies.

The only problem? None of those domain names were registered anytime recently - and three of them date back to over ten years ago.

Which you might think would end the story right there, except, of course - this being the superhero movie rumor mill - it didn't.

It didn't take Comicbook.com long to look a little further into the domain names that Warner Bros. have registered, and to discover that - if the logic that propelled the original story is solid - we're about to see a Metal Men movie, a Sandman movie, a Swamp Thing movie, a Plastic Man movie, and a Deadman movie.

Which means...what exactly?

After all, those aren't what you'd call household names - so who are we (potentially) about to see on the big screen? We thought we'd look at some of the coolest facts about each hero (or set of heroes) so that - even if we don't ever actually get them in movie-form - we can at least imagine just how weird those films would be.

First up:

Metal Men

Metal Men
Metal Men

- A team of artificially intelligent robots, the Metal Men are based on - and named after - six different metals: Gold, Iron, Lead, Mercury, Platinum and Tin.

- They've featured in the DC animated series Batman: The Brave and the Bold three times - as well as cameoing in the animated movie Justice League: The New Frontier.

- Barry Sonnenfeld (of Men in Black fame) is reportedly in talks to direct a movie version of the team.

Sandman

Sandman
Sandman

- The legendary DC/Vertigo comic was written by acclaimed author Neil Gaiman, back when he was better known for his work with comics.

- The comics starred Morpheus, the Lord of Dreams, and spanned centuries, dimensions, realities and time. So not quite Man of Steel, then.

- Joseph Gordon Levitt has signed on to direct - so this one's more likely to appear than most - and is currently working on a script.

Swamp Thing

Swamp Thing
Swamp Thing

- Created by Len Wein and Berni Wrightson in 1971, Swamp Thing was mysteriously preceded a few months earlier by the distinctly similar (and also briefly written by Wein) Man-Thing at Marvel. Both, though, bore a substantial resemblance to The Heap, a comic book character from the 1940s.

- Swamp Thing's most famous writer was Alan Moore - now more famous for Watchmen - whose acclaimed run changed the character from a transformed scientist-monster into an elemental being created by the same scientist's death. The - Wes Craven directed - 1982 movie was based on an earlier version of the character though.

- One of Swamp Thing's most popular allies? John Constantine - otherwise known as the star of NBC's upcoming series...Constantine.

Plastic Man

Plastic Man
Plastic Man

- A one time low level crook who developed stretching powers, Patrick 'Eel' O'Brian was originally a creation of Quality Comics back in 1941 - it wasn't until Quality shut down in 1956 that he was incorporated into the DC Comics universe.

- His sidekick Woozy Winks is - depending on the origin story - either a dopey but loyal friend, or an escaped mental patient.

- He may well have the weirdest villains of any superhero, including Red Herring, an anthropomorphic red herring, Mr. Cat, Baldy Bushwhack, Cheeseface and, of course, his arch enemy, Doctor Dome. Who has a dome-shaped helmet.

Deadman

Deadman
Deadman

- Arguably one of the strangest superheroes out there, Deadman's main claim to fame is that he is in fact actually dead. Now a ghost, the man formerly known as acrobat Boston Brand has the power to possess any living being.

- Deadman's first appearance back in Strange Adventures #205 featured the first known depiction of narcotics in a comic-book approved by the Comics Code Authority.

- He originally gained his powers after being murdered, and seeking justice. The man who helped him solve the crime? Batman, of course.

The big question now? Will we see any of these [DC](channel:932255) adaptations hit the big screen anytime soon?

Poll

What do you guys think? Who would you most like to see make it to the big screen?

via Comicbook.com

Trending

Latest from our Creators