ByRudie Obias, writer at Creators.co
Pop Culture and Movie Blogger (mental _floss and UPROXX). Film Geek. Charming Man. Always Asian. NYC. Follow me @Rudie_Obias.
Rudie Obias

With the increased popularity of [The Walking Dead](series:201193), it's curious that more broadcast and cable networks don't turn to popular graphic novel pages for new TV shows. Here are 5 graphic novels that should be TV shows and not big screen adaptations.

Y: The Last Man

This is almost a given. Brian K. Vaughn & Pia Guerra's landmark graphic novel has been itching for a live-adaptation since it launched in 2002. It's almost impossible to read "Y: The Last Man" without thinking about it as a long-form episodic piece of television on a premium cable network like HBO or Starz. The story of Yorick Brown and his monkey companion Ampersand has sparked the imagination of countless writers, artists, and directors over the past decade. In fact, two failed film projects from D.J. Caruso and Dan Trachtenberg never got off the ground, as the film right reverted back to its creators.

Overall, I think that a TV show is the way to go with "Y: The Last Man" instead of a big screen adaptation and Netflix or HBO would be the way to go in my eyes. However, the best way to experience "Y: The Last Man" is via the graphic novel.

Chew

Chew
Chew

"Chew" would be a great candidate for a case-of-the-week type of detective TV show for cable TV. The story follows Tony Chu, who has the ability to make psychic impressions of food items, including people. As long as he eats the food, again including people, he can see and feel what happened to them just before they died. This would also give networks the opportunity to have a new TV show with an Asian-American lead in the main role. While actor John Chu is an obvious choice, I would go with someone like Sung Kang (Fast Five) or Ken Leung (Lost) to play Tony Chu.

100 Bullets

100 Bullets
100 Bullets

While the premium cable network Showtime was developing "100 Bullets" for a new TV series, the project, as of late, has been scrapped for others. With the level of blood and gore on The Walking Dead, "100 Bullets" would seem like a perfect fit for AMC or HBO. The graphic novel follows Agent Graves, a mysterious figure who gives a new person (in every issue) a handgun and "100 bullets," and the chance for revenge for those who have done wrong by them. The comic is full of blood, violence, and sex, which might make for a good TV show and high ratings.

Ex Machina

Ex Machina
Ex Machina

There were plans for a film adaptation of Brian K. Vaughn and Tony Harris' "Ex Machina" in 2005, but New Line couldn't bring the film together and the rights reverted back to its creators in 2012. A TV series would be a better fit for the story, which follows Mitchell Hundred (AKA The Great Machine), the world's first and only superhero. He has the ability to "talk" to machines and almost prevented the attack on the World Trade Center on 9/11. The Great Machine only managed to save one building from crumbling, but still became the greatest hero in New York City history. In return, the people of NYC made Mitchell Hundred mayor. Now doesn't that sound like a ripping tale about politics and superheroes? And can't you see something like that on a weekly TV show?

Black Hole

Black Hole
Black Hole

At one time, David Fincher was attached to make a live-action big screen adaptation of "Black Hole," but the project fell apart and Fincher opted to direct The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo instead. The graphic novel has yet to be featured in a live-action version, but it did make a "cameo" appearance in this summer's Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. As far as I know, nothing is in the works, but I can see a TV series surrounding the bizarre coming-of-age tale set in the 70s on the small screen. Maybe Showtime or HBO can snag it!


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