ByJo Craig, writer at Creators.co
Movie Buff. Keen-eyed Photographer. Giddy Gamer. Depressing Writer. Follow Me @jokerjo7
Jo Craig

Michael Caine effectively tugged on some heart strings during his on-screen deliverance of Welsh poet Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night" during Christopher Nolan's Sci-Fi Adventure [Interstellar](movie:813746).

First published in 1951 featured in the journal Botteghe Oscure, Thomas's most recognizable piece of work was said to be written for his dying father, refraining repeatedly throughout to "Rage, rage against the dying of the light." His reputation was hardly amiable, but he supported his prominence as a "drunken and doomed poet" meeting his good friend death in 1953 when he slipped into a coma caused by pneumonia.

Thomas also worked with the BBC
Thomas also worked with the BBC

This particular villanellle has surprisingly been favored and highlighted in many cultures, ranging from TV show '[Doctor Who](series:200668)' to video game 'Assassin's Creed', 1996 film 'Independence Day' to "The Dying of the Light", the latest book in the Skulduggery Pleasant series.

It's most recent appearance in Interstellar (2014) is dramatized by character Professor Brand (Michael Caine) and Dr. Mann (Matt Damon) at different points in the movie, but most notably heard as Cooper's (Matthew McConaughey) team floats further away from Earth towards the unknown, a hauntingly powerful moment in Nolan's thought-provoking epic.

Interstellar is in cinema's now

The full poem appears below:

"Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night.
Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night.
Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
And you, my father, there on the sad height, Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray. Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light."

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