ByJonathan J Moya, writer at Creators.co
Movie loving owner of a fashion boutique.
Jonathan J Moya

Freelance colorist Nicolas Chapuis has gotten the knack of drawing Disney villains in their velvety darkness.

There are the long angular faces and the big square teeth that grimace evil. Show as little gum line as possible or punch a crooked smile to match the twisted jawline and stern chin. Get the eyes rights, especially the egg shell thin eyelids. If all those hard angles feel like they will cut and slash you open you are on the right track.

A nicely drawn villain has a grand reptilian neck or almost no neck at all.

And don't forget the accessories. A good hat that crests like a horn is a must-- or two (in the case of Maleficent) even better.

A good evil hairdo is a requisite for the non-hat villain. The only requirement: make it jagged like glass shards and look on fire.

In profile they must reveal evil. No warts or moles, please. That is so passe and Shakespearean.

Evil must always look wickedly stylish and well-groomed so simple goodness can stand out in stark contrast. They can be beautiful, preferably alluring so, but it all must be built on a pedestal of fragile ego that can come crashing down around them at the right moment. They must never look wholesome. Wholesomeness is solely for the heroine/good girl.

I'd say Nicolas Chapuis' works live up to all of these requisites. Take a look below!

For more of Nicolas Chapuis art see his deviantart page.

Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty

Captain Hook from Peter Pan

Cruella de Vil from 101 Dalmatians

Dr. Faclier from The Princess and the Frog

Governor Ratcliffe from Pocahontas

Hades from Hercules

Jafar from Aladdin

Lord Igzorn from Disney's Gummi Bears

Scar from The Lion King

Urusla from The Little Mermaid

For more like this see my blog.

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