ByAngela Shane, writer at Creators.co

Since CallerID became a common feature, tracing phone calls is pretty easy. Also, phone companies keep records of every call. Plus, it has come to notice that the NSA is tracking all the calls that people make. But when you hear about cases like these, you get the creeps...knowing that all safety features of a phone still cannot help if your time is up....

The Long Island Serial Killer:

Stretch of Ocean Parkway, Long Island
Stretch of Ocean Parkway, Long Island

Along a remote stretch of the Ocean Parkway in Long Island, the bodies of 14 women have been found. All of the women were associated with the sex trade, and the police believe that at least 10 of the bodies were dumped there by one man, known only as the “Long Island Serial Killer.”The unknown serial killer is believed to have gotten his start in 1996, but the first four bodies were not found until December 2010. Then, six more bodies were found between April and May 2011. All the women have been strangled and wrapped in a burlap sack before being dumped. There have been four other bodies found in the same area. However, they do not seem to match the other killings, so the police do not think the same man is responsible.Besides murdering the women, the killer also found a sadistic way to torment the family of one of his victims. On July 10, 2009, 24-year-old Melissa Barthelemy went missing. Shortly after that, Melissa’s younger sister, Amanda, started getting phone calls from her sister’s cell phone. Seven calls were made in all, and none of them lasted more than three minutes. The last call, which lasted about 40 seconds, took place on August 26, 2009, at 1:00 in the morning. During the call, the unidentified caller admitted he killed Melissa. Melissa was one of the bodies found in December 2010. The Long Island Serial Killer has yet to be identified and remains at large.

The Murder Of Tracey Kirkpatrick:

Tracey Kirkpatrick
Tracey Kirkpatrick

Tracey Kirkpatrick was a responsible 17-year-old who planned on going to school to become a lawyer. On March 15, 1989, she was working alone in a women’s sportswear store in Frederick, Maryland. Her manager stopped by the store at 8:00 PM. At 10:50 PM, a security guard was checking the shopping center and saw that the lights in the store were still on, so he went to investigate. In the storage room, he found Kirkpatrick dead from stab wounds to the chest and neck. The police were stumped as to who would kill the teenager, because the crime seemed motiveless. There was no sign of sexual assault and the store wasn’t robbed, but Kirkpatrick’s purse was gone.

The case went cold, but three months after the murder, a strange potential clue emerged. A man, who identified himself as “Don,” called a confession hotline. The hotline, which was based in Las Vegas, charged people per minute to confess their secrets and then charged others to call in and listen to those confessions. “Don,” who said he was from Frederick, Maryland, claimed he stabbed a young girl and thought about turning himself in, but he didn’t. He said he was sorry, but he couldn’t do anything to change what happened. Then he hung up.

The hotline sent a copy of the recording to the police, and it was also sent to radio stations in the hope that someone would recognize his voice. However, since “Don” didn’t specify that he murdered Kirkpatrick, it’s unclear if he is her murderer or a killer at all. The police had two viable suspects throughout the years, but no one has ever been charged in the murder of the 17-year-old honor student.

The Caller Who Predicted John F. Kennedy’s Assassination:

John F. Kennedy
John F. Kennedy

On November 22, 1963, just after 10:00 AM, a switchboard operator at General Electric in Oxnard, California answered a call. There was no one talking on the line, but since the caller could have been in some sort of trouble, the operator asked a coworker to pick up as well. That’s when thecaller whispered that the President would be killed at 10:10 AM. The caller, who sounded like a middle-aged woman reading things out loud, whispered some other warnings, such as “The justice. The Supreme Court. There’s going to be fire in all the windows. The government is going up in flames.” Also during the call, the caller placed the phone down and dialed 12–15 digits. The operator asked if she needed any help, and the woman responded in a clear voice, “No. I’m using the phone.”

Another call, made after 10:10 AM, insisted that the President was going to be killed at 10:30 AM. At 10:25 AM, they disconnected the call, thinking the caller was just a disturbed individual. Meanwhile, in Dallas, Texas, President John F. Kennedy was driving down Elm Street. The shots that killed the President were fired at 12:30 PM Central Time, meaning the time in California was 10:30 AM—exactly the time the caller mentioned. The phone company reported the call about an hour after the President was shot, and the FBI wrote a report about it. They were unable to trace the call, although the FBI still believes it was just a disturbed woman.

The Missing Crew Of Casie Nicole:

Casie Nicole
Casie Nicole

On April 11, 1990, Nathan Neesmith, his brother Billy Joe Neesmith, his nephew Keith Wilkes, and his friend Franklin Brantley set off from McIntosh County pier in Georgia to go on a seven-day commercial fishing expedition. Their ship, Casie Nicole, had just recently been docked for maintenance. They took it to an uncharted reef off the coast of South Carolina. Early in the morning on April 12, their boat capsized and quickly took on water. They had to abandon the ship, so they boarded a raft. Nathan Neesmith left the other three men in the raft with some food and went off in a wooden box to go find help. He was rescued five days later, but the rest of the men were never found. The only things ever found were a sleeping bag and a life vest.

One probable conclusion was that the men simply drowned at sea. While that is wholly possible, there were strange phone calls from a man who didn’t speak English, which made the families of the missing men think they were still alive. Starting about six weeks after the disappearance and continuing over the next year, there were seven calls made in all. Four weremade to Nathan’s sister, and the other three were made to a man named Doug Tyson, the owner of Casie Nicole. The caller would just repeat the phone number, say the name of the person he was calling and the name of one of the missing men, Billy Joe. In the last call, the man said he was going to bring them home. However, the men were never seen again.

The phone calls led the family to speculate that the men were actually rescued from the ocean but were being held captive in a foreign country. Yet, there is little evidence that helps shed light on what actually happened to the three fishermen.


The Abduction And Murder Of Amy Mihaljevic:

Amy Mihaljevic
Amy Mihaljevic

On April 27, 1989, a police officer had come to the class of 10-year-old Amy Mihaljevic to talk about how you should never go anywhere with a stranger. The problem was that the man who abducted and murdered Amy was not a stranger to her. They had talked over the phone a few times. Her brother overheard one conversation her sister had with a mystery man. Amy even told her friends about him, but she didn’t tell her parents or any other adults that a grown man was calling her. On that tragic day, Amy told a friend she was meeting her secret caller to go buy her mother a present. The man claimed to work with her mother and told Amy her mother had just been given a promotion. After school, Amy and a friend walked together until Amy went off to meet the mysterious man.

After Amy had met the man, he allowed her to call her mother, who assumed that Amy was calling from home. It was only after she arrived home that she realized that Amy had never been there. A frantic search of Bay Village, Ohio was done. But sadly, the little girl’s body was not found until February 7, 1990. Her head had signs of trauma, and it appeared that she was probably sexually assaulted and stabbed. It also looked like the body was dumped a short time after she was kidnapped. The barbaric murder made national headlines and was featured on America’s Most Wanted. Yet, no one has ever been arrested in connection with the crime. Investigators are still hoping to track down the mystery caller.

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