ByJay Forry, writer at Creators.co

Based on a true story, a woman takes on the whole country of Austria In the drama, Woman in Gold. Jewish refugee Maria Altmann (Helen Mirren) fled from Austria during the German invasion of World War II leaving family members and possessions behind. Years later when her sister dies, she finds letters that prove her family is the owner of several Gustag Klimt paintings, including a portrait titled Woman In Gold which was reportedly worth 135 million. She hires an inexperienced attorney named Randol Schoenberg (Ryan Reynolds) to advise her chances of getting the painting back. He goes to Austria with her and when the government turns them down, they reluctantly return to the U.S. Schoenberg says he will continue with the uphill battle to secure the paintings even though his wife Pam (Katie Holmes) protests. Schoenberg goes back to Austria and with the help of investigative reporter Max Irons (Daniel Gruhl) they take the Austrian government to court to have the paintings returned to their rightful owners. This film doesn't have hundreds of bullets flying around or heart-thumping car chase scenes, but it does have a compelling story that will keep your attention. (This is ideal for a blind guy who can’t see computer graphics.) The script was very well written and the chemistry between Reynolds and Mirren was absolutely perfect. The movie has some humor (great one-liners by Mirren) and the courtroom scenes by Reynolds weren't especially outstanding but were very, very good. I did become a little annoyed when flashbacks began happening during courtroom scenes, just when tension could have been at its peak. There is really nothing new in this film concerning the art that was stolen by the Nazi’s during World War II, but I enjoyed the story and I'm giving it a B rating.

Although I am blind, I can appreciate a good movie as well as sighted individuals. I rely more on a good story line than special effects. Visit my website at: blindsidereviews.com

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