ByIan M. Simpson, writer at Creators.co
I love superheroes and villains alike! I'm also a big fan of Sci-Fi, Fantasy, and Gaming! Follow me on Twitter! @The_Simpsonian
Ian M. Simpson

I don't write many reviews for Moviepilot, and that isn't because I hate reviews. If we're being honest, you guys prefer to read something fun and social...a listicle or a quiz maybe. But after Moviepilot hooked me up with premiere tickets for Mad Max: Fury Road, I knew this was one worthy of a review. It's just too amazing not to get that treatment.

Before I jump into Mad Max, here's a little about me. I am a huge Marvel fan. I always have been. I firmly believe that Avengers: Age of Ultron was one of Marvel's best, and a total win. That being said ... Mad Max: Fury Road blows Avengers out of the water.

The original Mad Max trilogy, if you're not familiar, is about the unfortunate circumstances that revolve around an Australian cop name Max Rockatansky, played then by Mel Gibson. In a matter of moments, his partner, his wife, and his child are all taken away from him, and he strives for vengeance against the biker gang that killed them.

From then on, Max started to roam the post-apocalyptic wasteland alone, only doing what is necessary to survive. He kills who he needs to kill and he spares those he doesn't, and on several occasions he is forced to help those in need. However, every moment he spends is haunted by the memory of his murdered family.

Max and his classic Interceptor
Max and his classic Interceptor

Fury Road starts out with Max , played by the incredible Tom Hardy, giving a brief narration as the scene opens on the vast wasteland. The action picks up right from the start as a band of War Boys shows up and attacks him. Max attempts to escape, but he is ultimately bested by the pale-skinned maniacs.

He is brought back to the Citadel, which is run by the evil warlord Immortan Joe, brought to life by Mad Max veteran Hugh Keays-Byrne. Max is branded and burned before thrown in a cell to be saved for further use. That further use comes into play quickly, as Max is strapped to the front of a war vehicle in a high-speed chase after Imperator Furiosa, played by the amazing Charlize Theron, who has taken something very valuable from Joe.

Max is forced to stop his solitary vagabonding and join forces with Furiosa as they flee from Immortan Joe, who has rallied his army of War Boys to take back what they stole, and at all costs.

Explosions during a high-speed chase.
Explosions during a high-speed chase.

At its core, Mad Max: Fury Road is an action film, and a magnificent one at that. The franchise has become known for its long vehicular brawls, with a lot of car-hopping and impressive explosions, and Fury Road delivers plenty of both.

Out of all of the action flicks I've seen over the past several years, including superhero films, Fury Road lays claim to the most enjoyable action sequences. Each and every bullet fired, every explosive lance thrown, and every car flip was visually spectacular. I found myself baffled through many points in the film, wondering how such stunts were possible. The trailers weren't lying when they said director George Miller was a mastermind. I've never watched anything so visually intense!

A high-speed chase into a sandstorm.
A high-speed chase into a sandstorm.

Mad Max is without a doubt, one of the most, if not the most beautiful movies I have ever had the pleasure of watching. Every shot is breath-taking, and the visual effects are simply mesmerizing. From the high-speed car chases and the massive explosions, to the colossal sandstorm that rages across the wasteland, the scope of the movie is nothing short of incredible.

The colors are very vibrant and dynamic, with the day setting highlighted in bright orange while the night scenes are accentuated with a deep blue aura.

The style of the shots in Fury Road really makes the movie what it is. The quick shot changes and the constant sporadic glitch-like moments draw you in as you get to experience the madness that Max is put through.

Nicholas Hoult as Nux (left) and Charlize Theron as Furiosa (right)
Nicholas Hoult as Nux (left) and Charlize Theron as Furiosa (right)

The characters of the film are all very immersive, and you can't help but feel a connection with each and every one of them, except for Joe (who you root against). Of course we had a lot of screen time with Max and Furiosa, but there was another interesting character that was featured heavily throughout the film, and that would be Nicholas Hoult's character Nux.

Nux is one of the War Boys, who pledge devoted servitude to Joe in their quest for a "shiny" afterlife. Nux starts out the film ready to do whatever it takes to please Joe. At one point he gets giddy just because Joe glances at him. We get to see quite a dynamic character arc as Nux starts to question his devotion and alignment choices.

The Doof Wagon leading the charge.
The Doof Wagon leading the charge.

A huge factor that drew me into the movie back when I saw the trailer was the score. The action of the film was framed nicely by the drum beats and rocker-pace of the music. The drummers and electric guitar player atop the monstrous "Doof Wagon" were an interesting addition to the film, although flame spurting out of the guitar has become one of the most iconic scenes of the trailer.

Hugh Keays-Byrne as Immortan Joe.
Hugh Keays-Byrne as Immortan Joe.

There are very few moments in the film that took away fro the experience for me. The first of which was the character of Immortan Joe. Sure, he's a menacing villain, and I certainly wouldn't want to cross him in any form or fashion, but he doesn't have much character development or exposition. All we know is that he is a tyrannical warlord, but I would have preferred to learn a little bit more about him.

The other complaint would be the story itself. It's a great story, don't get me wrong, but with all of the intense action going on all of the time, the story sort of gets lost in comparison.

These are only minor complaints, as I enjoyed every second of the film. I can't wait to go see it again in theaters, and I can't stress it enough that you all should see it as well. Sure, you could wait until the movie comes out on DVD or Blu-Ray, or you could just buy the digital copy, but the experience is just so fulfilling on a big screen. With the size and scope of the movie, you can't risk missing out on any detail. After all, this certainly is George Miller's maddest movie yet.

Make sure to catch Mad Max: Fury Road in theaters May 15!

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