ByTom Somerfield, writer at Creators.co
A UK-based teen looking for the next good bad joke and an excuse to nerd out. This is me in my spare time.
Tom Somerfield

Lately, Moviepilot (pretty darn awesomely) sent me to London MCM Comic-Con as press. I had a really great time, and among the coolest things I got to do was have a chat with the cast of hit CW show Arrow, which has just completed its third season. Awesome, huh?

Yes... I am intrigued...
Yes... I am intrigued...

So, seeing as I think the interview has been uploaded online by another reporter who interviewed them alongside me, I'm really getting everything I found out online as quickly as I can. Ya know, just for the "I said it first" rights and what not. Sill though, seeing as you guys are nice folk, I'll include the video at the bottom.

Quit judging, Stark.
Quit judging, Stark.

So, one of the great and interesting things about interviewing actors and actresses is that you get to know their thoughts on their own characters and the world their character lives in. Bearing this in mind, one of my highlights of the interview was when they got to talking about was the importance of superhero shows on TV, and films in our local cinemas.

We need these guys... No, seriously.
We need these guys... No, seriously.

The stars in question in my particular interview were Willa Holland, who plays Thea Queen (and more recently, Speedy,) Karl Yune, who gave us an amazing character in the form of Maseo and Sarab, and Rila Fukushima, who portrays Maseo's wife, Tatsu.

Or, yaknow, his killer, Katana. Whichever way you wanna look at it.

She kills me? Oh...
She kills me? Oh...

Anywho, back to what I was rambling about, me and a few other reporters got talking to the three about the importance and impact of superhero-based shows and movies. What they had to say, as you might have guessed, was pretty interesting.

My first discovery was that, incredibly, Willa Holland is a pretty serious comics nerd:

I grew up as a bit of a DC nerd, so I really had a profound appreciation for coming onto the show... I know what I'm talking about when it comes to this stuff.

So taking away from this, I learnt that these actors and actresses who seemingly just showed up and read a script actually knew their stuff, and it was great getting to hear out their opinion on the superheros that not only they played, but those that they grew up with. When asked if they thought the world would ever tire of cinema pieces involving caped crusaders and super soldiers, Karl Yune's first response was simple:

No.

After that, we got, thankfully, some slightly more in-depth answers:

Willa:

I don't really see it happening, um... I mean, there was that period of time where we just had that slew of Batmans and Supermans coming out. It wasn't obviously as many as there is now, but there was still that period of time and if anything people are still like 'where did it all go?' and 'why wasn't it good enough?'. [laughs]

Karl picked up thoughtfully on that afterwards, quoting:

Yeah, I think, if anything, the world in reality needs the morality tale of our superhero stories, I mean, we need that. And especially with things that are going on today, we need that sense of hope, and 'do the right thing wherever you can, protect people who need protecting.' Yaknow, it's very inspirational for me.

This was really nice to hear, mostly because I agree with it all. Y'see, it's my opinion that most comic book stories (let alone TV shows & films) involving superheroes carry a strong moral message. Heck, Superman's origin story is meant to represent the struggle of immigration.

Superman: "Say what now?"
Superman: "Say what now?"

Willa chirped in again immediately, obviously enthusiastic about the subject:

Yeah, I think it's a fairly good message to be putting out there. I mean, beside from the villain stuff and what they're doing, I mean I wouldn't tell anybody here to go become Malcolm Merlyn and kill five hundred and three people... but I would say, totally, yaknow if you wanted to protect people - wait I'm notsaying suit up or anything either but - I think people can do that in their own ways. We can all stick together, be protective and work as this human, connected unit.

More than anything, this has made me an even larger fan of Arrow. I think there really is a need for superheroes - so it's fantastic to know that the actors playing them respect their roles, and want to do the best they can.

Verging on creepy there, Digg.
Verging on creepy there, Digg.

What's more, I think that an appreciation of the heroes we see in comics by the actors can be neccessary. I mean, we all know Iron Man has to be one of the best-acted characters out there - and that may only be because RDJ is truly, truly awesome, but I doubt he got that good without the homework he did.

And I don't mean the homework he did on how to build Iron Man suits.

Yes, we know, you're cool. We get it.
Yes, we know, you're cool. We get it.

Well, overall, if this post hasn't done much for you, I hope that at least it's given you faith in the actors who are tasked with producing our favorite shows. I think, and I believe most people reading this also think, that superhero and comic culture is now a large part of society in general, and even though sometimes our beloved characters aren't real, we can at least strive to make the world as awesome a place as they would do.

And hey, don't take that from me, take that from the cast of Arrow.

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