ByMicah James Nebeker, writer at Creators.co
Fan of all things superhero, Star Wars, or Lord of the Rings related. And aspiring artist.
Micah James Nebeker

Hello internet!! I formulated an interesting theory or an idea in my head a while back and I thought it was cool enough that I ought to share it with all y'all.

Now, I'm a Christian, so that's why I thought this theory was pretty awesome. If you don't believe in God, you might not find this as intriguing, but hey, you still might enjoy it nonetheless. So, buckle up while I take you for a drive through what goes on in my head. It's gonna be a bumpy ride!

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Two of the greatest authors of all time!!!
Two of the greatest authors of all time!!!

For those of you who don't know who J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis are, they were both book-writers. C.S. Lewis is perhaps best known through his seven-book series the Chronicles on Narnia. Several of these books have even been made into successful movies.

J.R.R. Tolkien is the genius behind the epic novels such as The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. These four books have been made into six amazing films!!

These two masterminds were good friends and both were Christians. I'm not sure exactly how this played out, but they ended up agreeing to both write a novel that stemmed from the Bible. After that they wrote sequels and other books on the subject, thus the books mentioned above were born. The Chronicles of Narnia had a more obvious Biblical theme to it while the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings had kind of Biblical Easter-eggs hidden throughout them.

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Susan with a bow.
Susan with a bow.

In C.S. Lewis' books, one of the main characters, Susan Pevensie, is given a magical horn by Father Christmas. When he gave the horn to her he told Susan that whenever she blew into the horn help would come no matter where she was. And sure enough, whenever she was in danger, pressed her lips up to the horn and blew, someone was there to help sooner or later.

Caspian blowing the horn.
Caspian blowing the horn.

In the second book of the series, Prince Caspian, Susan's horn falls into the hands of the young prince named in the title. He falls into a slight mishap and blows the horn, having heard of its magical ability.

It isn't until weeks later that Susan Pevensie and her siblings come and help save the day. He was expecting an army or something, but the four Pevensies turned out alright.

It may have taken a while, but the horn always brings aid eventually.

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Boromir, son of Denethor!
Boromir, son of Denethor!

Boromir is a character from J.R.R. Tolkien's books, the Lord of the Rings and like Susan, Boromir has a gifted horn.

This horn is named the Horn of Gondor. It was handed down from generation to generation, given to the oldest son in the line of Stewards of Gondor and the horn had come to Boromir. It is said that the Horn would not go unheeded when blown in times of trouble. (Sound familiar?) Boromir blows his horn three different times in the movie made from the book. Let's take a look at those three instances.

He blows it when he and the rest of the Fellowship of the Ring (the good guys) leave Rivendell and start off on their mission to save the world. This was a tradition of his whenever he started out on a long journey.

The second time he blows it is in the Mines of Moria when they are being pursued by countless orcs, goblins, and even a Balrog (basically a huge giant demon). When he blows the horn, the monsters, even the mighty Balrog, halter for a moment.

And finally, he blows the horn for the last time when he is in battle with the Uruk Hai (really tough, mutated orcs). He is fighting dozens of them single-handed and blows his horn asking for aid. Aragorn (one of the good guys) comes running, but is too late. He fights for Boromir, but the arrow wounds he sustained were too deep and death won him over.

Boromir dies. SPOILERS!!!!
Boromir dies. SPOILERS!!!!

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Wow, both book series' have two horns with pretty similar affects. Coincidence?!? Maybe...

I don't know this next part for sure, but here's what I think these two guys did. I think they both had their horns in their stories on purpose and that they both symbolize something. That something, I think, is prayer.

Blowing through the horns is symbolic of shouting out to God in our time of need. And, just like the horns, our prayers never go unanswered. God always answers our prayers. Whether He answers practically right away, or a year from your prayer, He always answers. Also, His answer may not always be very clear, or exactly what we want it to be.

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When Susan's horn was blown, sometimes help would be there in seconds. This symbolizes a fast-acting prayer that God answers quickly. But when Caspian blew and the help didn't come until weeks later, that was symbolic of a slow-acting prayer that God (for whatever his reasons may be) didn't answer for a while.

And then when Caspian received his help of four kids when he wanted warriors, that represented how God works by His terms not by ours. He doesn't always give us what we want, just what we need.

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Boromir's horn I think represents whole other aspects of prayer. When he first blows it when he's first setting off on his journey, I think that's supposed to remind us of how our prayer life should be. We need to make an effort to pray consistently, as Boromir does every time he goes on a quest. That prayer before we charge into say a spiritual battle will help to protect us from evil and should be something we do everyday, preparing us to be better Christians (for those of you readers who are Christians of course).

The second time he blows his horn just adds onto what I was talking about the first time he blew it. The monsters and yes, even the demon stopped in their tracks for just a second when he blew. That just shows the power of prayer on a spiritual level. It's symbolic of how physically painful it is for the Devil and his demons when we pray. We say, "Dear God", they cringe. We say, "Amen", they howl in agony!

The third time is the time that he dies. This represents the sad truth that sometimes God says no when we pray for someone to survive after a car-wreck or for someone to make it through the battle with cancer. Sometimes God takes people from our lives. Whatever His reasoning, He does, even if we pray for a different outcome. Again, we don't always get our way. It's sad, but we have to remember that God's plan is a bazillion times bigger than ours.

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God bless y'all! I hope you enjoyed this article and thanks for taking time to read it!!

Poll

Well, what do you think? Is it possible that C.S. Lewis' horn and J.R.R. Tolkien's horn could symbolize prayer, or am I just crazy?

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