ByAllanah Faherty, writer at Creators.co
Senior staff writer | Twitter: @allanahfaherty | Email: [email protected]
Allanah Faherty

The entire world over there is one tiny plastic doll who is instantly recognizable to children and adults alike - Barbie. The tall, blonde doll was launched way back in 1959 and still remains a hugely successful toy for girls almost 60 years later.

Because of Barbie's instantly recognizable face, French photography Catherine Théry decided to take the doll and recreate famous paintings using her as the main subject. The art collection, titled 'Not the Ones You Think,' showed recently in Paris, and was intended to raise questions and make a statement about "beauty, intelligence and women's place in society." In most cases of the replicas, Barbie replaced male subjects.

Take a look at the creative art works and see if you prefer any in their new 'Barbie-fied' state:

The Last Supper - Leonard da Vinci

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

Théry's version, replacing all 13 men with female Barbies, makes for a very interesting take on the classic - not to mention their choice of food!

The Death of Marat - Jacques-Louis David

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

Found dead in the bathtub, the painting of French revolutionary leader Jean-Paul Marat certainly looks just as dramatic with the fantastic plastic doll.

The Scream - Edvard Munch

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

The Scream has been parodied many times over the years, though this version is certainly one of the best.

The Son of Man - René Magritte

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

Speaking about his famous painting Magritte said "there is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us," and this is certainly true in this version with Barbie, especially considering the doll is often considered to have an unrealistic or unobtainable level of beauty.

The Two Fridas - Frida Kahlo

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

In this artwork Barbie hasn't replaced any men, but rather the two versions of Frida Kahlo. In the original painting it is thought that Kahlo was representing her Paternal German side on the left, and Maternal Spanish and Amerindian side on the right. What do you think Barbie is representing?

Gabrielle d’Estrées et une de ses soeurs - Artist unknown

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

This is another painting where Barbie does not replace men, but rather two women. Interestingly the pinching of the nipple in the artwork is thought to be a symbolic announcement that the woman on the right was pregnant.

The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp - Rembrandt

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

Barbie has certainly played a surgeon before, but whether or not she attended an anatomy class where the cadaver was chained down is unknown...

The Luncheon on the Grass - Édouard Manet

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

While the nude Barbie has stayed very similar, changing the gender of the two Dandies brings a new dimension to the artwork.

The Card Players - Cezanne

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

Despite changing the gender of the subject, the two Barbies look just as absorbed by their game as the two men.

The Creation of Adam - Michelangelo

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

In an interesting twist, God has become a blonde haired plastic babe, with a plunging neckline and a great pair of boots!

American Gothic - Grant Wood

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

American Gothic is one of the most famous Americana paintings of all time. The artwork depicts men and women in their traditional roles. By swapping the man in the painting for a female Barbie it, in my opinion, makes for one of the most powerful recreations in Théry's whole collection.

The Nobleman with His Hand on His Chest - El Greco

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

El Greco painted a number of unknown noblemen throughout his life, so it adds a nice twist to see one of them swapped out for a noblewoman (albeit a bearded one!).

Olympia - Édouard Manet

Source: Catherine Théry
Source: Catherine Théry

This once-extremely controversial image is another in which Barbie does not replacing male subjects, however it is still interesting to see Barbie in the painting, especially because the subject of Olympia is widely thought to be a prostitute (indicated by the orchid in her hair, her bracelet and pearl earrings as well as the shawl on which she lies).

Sources: Catherine Thery, Bored Panda

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