ByLupema Celis-castillo, writer at Creators.co

Sometimes mental health can be a bit tricky. What makes some people feel better might make others feel really crappy.

1. You binge-watch Netflix whenever you’re feeling run down.

While escaping from the world through an extra-long Netflix binge can feel like a good distraction in the moment, it could actually make you feel worse in the long run. Clinical psychologist Jennifer Taitz, Psy.D., previously told BuzzFeed Life: “People have come to me profoundly depressed after Netflix binges. Treatment for depression is getting active, and feeling purposeful and accomplished. Watching TV is passive.” Better advice: Use your favorite comfort TV show as a reward for productivity, a way to wind down at the end of the day, or as a social activity (all things that will make you feel less depressed). This site lets you sync up Netflix with others remotely so you can watch with a friend even on days you can’t get out of bed.
While escaping from the world through an extra-long Netflix binge can feel like a good distraction in the moment, it could actually make you feel worse in the long run. Clinical psychologist Jennifer Taitz, Psy.D., previously told BuzzFeed Life: “People have come to me profoundly depressed after Netflix binges. Treatment for depression is getting active, and feeling purposeful and accomplished. Watching TV is passive.” Better advice: Use your favorite comfort TV show as a reward for productivity, a way to wind down at the end of the day, or as a social activity (all things that will make you feel less depressed). This site lets you sync up Netflix with others remotely so you can watch with a friend even on days you can’t get out of bed.

2. You avoid stressful situations when you’re anxious so save yourself even more anxiety.

No one wants to trigger themselves, so it might feel good to avoid situations that make you anxious, such as a party if you suffer from social phobia. Weirdly enough, though, the more you avoid, the worse you make your anxiety, says Taitz, since you build it up and never get the chance to see that things will be OK. Better advice: Put yourself in situations that challenge your anxiety, even if it feels bad in the moment. It will help in the long run. “The way to develop or worsen an anxiety disorder is to avoid and the way to recover is to approach your fear of situations,” says Taitz.
No one wants to trigger themselves, so it might feel good to avoid situations that make you anxious, such as a party if you suffer from social phobia. Weirdly enough, though, the more you avoid, the worse you make your anxiety, says Taitz, since you build it up and never get the chance to see that things will be OK. Better advice: Put yourself in situations that challenge your anxiety, even if it feels bad in the moment. It will help in the long run. “The way to develop or worsen an anxiety disorder is to avoid and the way to recover is to approach your fear of situations,” says Taitz.

3. You take mental health days when you’re feeling overwhelmed with life.

Mental health days are great in theory, but most people don’t actually use them effectively — aka they spend them sleeping, watching Netflix, or doing nothing at all. But according to Taitz, you’ll feel much better if you take them super sparingly — and if you plan out what you’ll do when you take them. Better advice: First of all, don’t make mental health days your go-to solution, says Taitz: “On days that you wake up and aren’t feeling great mentally, go in, but give yourself permission to leave early if you don’t improve.” Many people will feel better once they get to work. When you do decide you need to take a mental health day, it should be action-filled, because you feel better when you’re productive and living with purpose, says Taitz. For example, if you’re taking a day because you really hate your job and it’s making you miserable, take the day to meet with a career coach and apply to new jobs.
Mental health days are great in theory, but most people don’t actually use them effectively — aka they spend them sleeping, watching Netflix, or doing nothing at all. But according to Taitz, you’ll feel much better if you take them super sparingly — and if you plan out what you’ll do when you take them. Better advice: First of all, don’t make mental health days your go-to solution, says Taitz: “On days that you wake up and aren’t feeling great mentally, go in, but give yourself permission to leave early if you don’t improve.” Many people will feel better once they get to work. When you do decide you need to take a mental health day, it should be action-filled, because you feel better when you’re productive and living with purpose, says Taitz. For example, if you’re taking a day because you really hate your job and it’s making you miserable, take the day to meet with a career coach and apply to new jobs.

4. You get a lot of sleep. Like, a LOT.

Getting sleep is super important for your mental health, but it’s easy to sleep too much when you’re not feeling so hot mentally. And that actually works against you. “Too much sleep is bad for your mental health, because basically to feel better in your life, you need to be active,” says Taitz. “You’ll notice also that if you sleep more, you’ll feel groggier. There’s a threshold, similar to food. You need it, but too much of it is going to make you feel sick.” Better advice: Find out how much sleep you actually need and stick to it, as well as trying to go to sleep and wake up at relatively the same time every day.
Getting sleep is super important for your mental health, but it’s easy to sleep too much when you’re not feeling so hot mentally. And that actually works against you. “Too much sleep is bad for your mental health, because basically to feel better in your life, you need to be active,” says Taitz. “You’ll notice also that if you sleep more, you’ll feel groggier. There’s a threshold, similar to food. You need it, but too much of it is going to make you feel sick.” Better advice: Find out how much sleep you actually need and stick to it, as well as trying to go to sleep and wake up at relatively the same time every day.

5. You distract yourself from the things you’re worried about.

Don’t worry, be happy, right? Nope. That actually backfires completely, cognitive behavioral psychologist Simon Rego, Psy.D., tells BuzzFeed Life, because the more you try to distract yourself from a thought, the more you think about it. “Plus, distraction prevents us from actually learning how to cope with our worries, so we’ll be more vulnerable to experiencing worry again in the future,” he says. Better advice: It may sound backward, but facing your worries really helps, says Rego. He suggests giving yourself a set “worry time” on a daily basis, so you can put aside worries in the moment and and work through them productively at a later time. You’ll probably find that by the time you sit down to problem solve, you won’t be as worried as you were to begin with.
Don’t worry, be happy, right? Nope. That actually backfires completely, cognitive behavioral psychologist Simon Rego, Psy.D., tells BuzzFeed Life, because the more you try to distract yourself from a thought, the more you think about it. “Plus, distraction prevents us from actually learning how to cope with our worries, so we’ll be more vulnerable to experiencing worry again in the future,” he says. Better advice: It may sound backward, but facing your worries really helps, says Rego. He suggests giving yourself a set “worry time” on a daily basis, so you can put aside worries in the moment and and work through them productively at a later time. You’ll probably find that by the time you sit down to problem solve, you won’t be as worried as you were to begin with.

Okay thats all bye.

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