ByRose Moore, writer at Creators.co
Writer, cosplayer and all around nerd. @RoseMooreWrites
Rose Moore

Today is the final day of our , and the final confession...is an embarrassing obsession!

Following on fittingly from yesterday's post about a re-watchable series, this takes us a step further. Now we are beyond the territory of something I would watch more than once, and into the realm of devoted fangirling.

Being a giant nerd, there are actually several shows that have wormed their way into every area of my life; logos on clothing, adorably themed pet bowls, framed art prints, graphic novels, dainty jewelry, even tattoos.

However, being a giant nerd, I don't really consider any of this embarrassing.

I'm a proud Browncoat, a public Trekkie, an open Whovian, a Wayward Son...however, even in geekdom, there's one that I possibly shouldn't love quite as much as I do.

Buffy The Vampire Slayer (1997 - 2003)

Let me just get it out there: I LOVE Buffy The Vampire Slayer. I've loved it since it first aired and I was an impressionable tween. At the time, of course, I just thought it was a really fun show, and that Buffy was everything I wanted to be.

However, the older I get, the more I respect the series; the complexity, the fantasy elements, the moments of horror, and the humor of it all. It's a little ridiculous, and the show never shies away from that.

It's perfectly happy to poke fun at itself at times, and to recognize how far fetched it can be. At the same time, it has it's serious moments and themes. Above and beyond the usual relatable-teen-trauma, Buffy deals with the concept of "good monsters", with responsibility and self-determination, with looming mortality, with fear and pain and loss.

It's also an incredibly diverse show, and that's something that has held up over time. Where many 90's shows now seem painfully outdated with their vaguely homophobic or sexist jokes (*cough* Friends *cough*) Buffy stands the test of time. It's not just the oft-mentioned cast of strong female characters, but the balance of genders that helps. There are enough women in the show that they can be complex people, not just stereotypes. Buffy herself is incredibly strong, but incredibly flawed as well, and even thoroughly unlikeable at times. Willow is one of my favorite TV characters ever, and the story of her discovering her sexuality was one that helped so many nerds figure out their own (myself included). It's amazing to watch a show that first aired nearly twenty years ago, and that remains more diverse than many airing now.

The show came to a close in 2003, but there are still so many ways for fans like me to indulge the vampire-slaying obsession. First, there was the spin-off, Angel. Despite featuring two of my three least favorite Buffy characters (Angel and Cordelia), it's worth watching and has a few really great moments. Then, the powers that be decided to resurrect the series as an ongoing comic book by Dark Horse Comics.

Add to this cinema sing-a-longs of the musical episode Once More With Feeling and a seemingly never-ending supply of Buffy-themed merchandise and art, and it seems that my time as a Scooby never has to end...

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