ByVaria Fedko-Blake, writer at Creators.co
Staff Writer at Moviepilot! [email protected] Twitter: @vfedkoblake
Varia Fedko-Blake

A lot of the time, before a TV show makes it big and secures a regular slot on our small screens, it's pitched and made into a pilot. Indeed, every year passionate writers, producers and directors pour their hearts into projects that they hope will be welcomed by TV audiences all over.

The following five shows are examples of some of the most mind-boggling ideas ever pitched. And whilst they actually went on to be piloted on our screens, they were hastily scrapped by networks. Check them and decide for yourself whether the decision to ditch the series was the right one:

1. Poochinski (1990)

Plot: After a Chicago police detective is killed in action, his soul finds its way into a bulldog, which continues to fight crime in his name.

No, this is not a joke. And considering the pooch-in-question was unconvincingly portrayed by a dog puppet with problematic lip-syncing issues, it was always going to struggle with being a TV hit.

Poll

Was the network right to cancel the show?

2. Heil Honey, I'm Home! (1990)

Plot: The series focused on documenting the 'hilarious' lives of 'The Hitlers' and their on-going difficulties with their Jewish neighbors. I wish I was joking.

There are some things that should never be turned into a comedy -- shame on you, BBC.

Poll

Was the network right to cancel the show?

3. The Adventures of Superpup (1958)

Plot: The story followed a series of anthropomorphic animals with huge heads far too big for their ridiculous bodies. The main character was called Bark Bent (note the wonderful parody of the name Clark Kent), who was a canine Superman working at the Beagley Barkit (Daily Planet).

Apart from praising the show for its commendable dog pun effort, ultimately many agreed that The Adventures of Superpup was definitely barking up the wrong tree.

Poll

Was the network right to cancel the show?

4. Steel Justice (1992)

Plot: The focus is on cop David Nash (Robert Taylor), who is bitter about a gang leader exploding his son with a rocket launcher. Naturally, he gets a relatively-immobile, crime-fighting robot that breathes fire and eats cars involved.

Sadly, because there were only so many times that gangsters could lament the tragic destruction of their cars, the series didn't get very far at all.

Here's the first part of the pilot:


Poll

Was the network right to cancel the show?

5. Wishman (1983)

Plot: Naturally because E.T. was such a wild success, it became apparent that it was imperative that a mutant toddler named Wishman also be saved from an evil government agency.

No thanks.

Poll

Was the network right to cancel the show?

Sources: screenrant.com

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