ByD.M. Anderson, writer at Creators.co
Writer, reviewer, loves life in the dark. freekittensmovieguide.blogspot.com
D.M. Anderson

Narrated by Jason Bateman. Directed by Daniel Junge & Kief Davidson. (2015, 93 min). ANCHOR BAY

Along with my Hot Wheels, Lego was my favorite childhood toy. I had a massive box of bricks, a collection which grew to the point where I could damn near construct an entire town.

I don't have either anymore, much to my regret. I blew up all my Hot Wheels with firecrackers once I hit puberty, but I'll be damned if I know whatever happened to my Legos (maybe they're still in my parents' attic). Decades later, I still miss them both. Perhaps I long for my Legos just a little more because, even at my advanced age, the idea of dumping all those multi-colored bricks onto the floor and building a starship still sounds like a hell of a lot of fun.

Much of A Lego Brickumentary is dedicated to that...the adult who still finds great joy in building with Lego. Narrated by Jason Bateman (animated as a Lego character himself), this is a charming little documentary doesn't spend as much time on the toy's history as I'd like, but does a great job showing its worldwide impact, not only on the toy business, but science, entertainment and modern culture.

"Great...now I gotta put all this back in the box."
"Great...now I gotta put all this back in the box."

For some folks, it's a pleasant hobby, while others belong to a sub-culture who take it seriously enough to attend conventions, create Lego-related films, enter high-stakes building contests or actually end up working for Lego itself. We meet people who've turned Lego building into an art form (one lady's version of Tolkien's Rivendell is jaw dropping), a team who built a full scale Star Wars X-wing fighter and one guy whose robotic rover was impressive enough for Lego to turn it into one of their products.

This is all pretty fascinating stuff, presented in a light-hearted, entertaining manor which, unlike similar films depicting a so-called 'geek culture', never devolves into thinly-veiled contempt for its obsessive subjects. In fact, it made me want to venture to Toys 'R Us and grab myself a few sets to reclaim a bit of my childhood. And if Lego was even a small part of your own youth, chances are you'll enjoy this film as well.

from FREE KITTENS MOVIE GUIDE

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