ByDaniel Roberto Archila, writer at Creators.co
If it's predominantly explosive, I'm in.
Daniel Roberto Archila

I will examine the thematic elements driven to the viewer's psyche in the 2004 drama, "Crash." Written and directed by Paul Haggis, this post-9/11 story analyzes the true, raw, merit of our American society, responding to just how accustomed to the "mixing pot of culture" we really are… and yet, how assumption can be our worse enemy. With an ensemble cast and a convincingly accurate interweave of plot lines and character arcs, the Reviewer truly felt he was there in the action, except, with this God-like view, he kept wondering how each situation may prove convenience or consequence to the other characters. And while it did seem lacking in tying the smaller loose ends, the resolution itself did prove quite fascinating, yet typical of our humanity.

The film follows an arc in Los Angeles, that truly keeps me enthralled by the actions of the characters. Don Cheadle plays a detective who's on the lookout for his brother. His brother, who cavorts with his accomplice, Ludacris, spends time stealing cars and selling it for monetary gain. This causes Sandra Bullock to be irate at both the locksmith and her housemaid. Bullock plays the coddled trophy wife of an arrogant district attorney, Brendan Fraser, who won't take no for an answer. On the other side of the spectrum, the locksmith, played by Michael Peña, has a little girl he protects at home.

By rite of his job, he sometimes gets into conflict with customers, such as a Persian shopkeeper, who just bought a gun. But Peña would rather die, or walk away from an attacker, than put anyone in any real trouble. Matt Dillon may have a father at home who is sick and in need of dire health support, but on and off duty, this officer is one of the most racist, and yet, in times of need, is the most reliable. Yes, when he pulled over T.V. Director Terence Howard's Lincoln he mistook for Ludacris's stolen one, he took advantage of the situation and fondled his wife, Thandie Newton. But after a fight on set, when Thandie drives in grieving with a denial of forgiveness from Terence, she crashes her car and is trapped in her seatbelt upside-down, helpless. Who saves her? Matt Dillon. Whether she likes it or not, Thandie will be saved by the hand that bites her. And I believe that was the most important moment in the story.

This paper will examine the thematic elements driven to the viewer's psyche in the 2004 drama, "Crash." Written and directed by Paul Haggis, this post-9/11 story analyzes the true, raw, merit of our American society, responding to just how accustomed to the "mixing pot of culture" we really are… and yet, how assumption can be our worse enemy. With an ensemble cast and a convincingly accurate interweave of plot lines and character arcs, the Reviewer truly felt he was there in the action, except, with this God-like view, he kept wondering how each situation may prove convenience or consequence to the other characters. And while it did seem lacking in tying the smaller loose ends, the resolution itself did prove quite fascinating, yet typical of our humanity.

The film follows an arc in Los Angeles, that truly keeps me enthralled by the actions of the characters. Don Cheadle plays a detective who's on the lookout for his brother. His brother, who cavorts with his accomplice, Ludacris, spends time stealing cars and selling it for monetary gain. This causes Sandra Bullock to be irate at both the locksmith and her housemaid. Bullock plays the coddled trophy wife of an arrogant district attorney, Brendan Fraser, who won't take no for an answer. On the other side of the spectrum, the locksmith, played by Michael Peña, has a little girl he protects at home. By rite of his job, he sometimes gets into conflict with customers, such as a Persian shopkeeper, who just bought a gun. But Peña would rather die, or walk away from an attacker, than put anyone in any real trouble. Matt Dillon may have a father at home who is sick and in need of dire health support, but on and off duty, this officer is one of the most racist, and yet, in times of need, is the most reliable.

Yes, when he pulled over T.V. Director Terence Howard's Lincoln he mistook for Ludacris's stolen one, he took advantage of the situation and fondled his wife, Thandie Newton. But after a fight on set, when Thandie drives in grieving with a denial of forgiveness from Terence, she crashes her car and is trapped in her seatbelt upside-down, helpless. Who saves her? Matt Dillon. Whether she likes it or not, Thandie will be saved by the hand that bites her. And I believe that was the most important moment in the story. In our time and day of age, we happen to be racist. But we are told to accept that anyway, because when a situation happens and it is even remotely relative to a person’s ethnicity, humans are naturally inclined to blame the most likely because we are too stupid to think more. And then we’re just inclined to also take any help we can get because we are selfish. Truly. The plot withheld enough information to keep me interested, therefore there was always another interaction between characters to look forward to. I cared so deeply about the characters because their situations, such as Matt Dillon’s father being ill, and the same for Don Cheadle’s mother being incapable to think straight or operate.

It provided me many stories, such as Sandra Bullock’s situation, which very early in the film was resolved. However, I want to know more about certain characters like the Persian daughter and her mother. What exactly do they plan to do with the hand pistol? The dialogue rings convincing and therefore, it does not seem like a rehash of other films. Although the film did have an omnivescent POV, I did not clearly see much effort in creating visual porn through the use of cinematography. It felt weak in that aspect and only set up the shots as they were necessary, save for the moment when Michael cries in pain for the supposed “death” of his daughter, that Vertigo Zoom immersed me in the moment and made me worry. The point of view in this, may be seen through God-like perspective, in the last shot especially, we see that the resolution? There is none. People are always going to be assumptious and never racist enough, thus the film takes the point it tries to make quite seriously if not seriously enough. Between car crashes, stand-offs and heated arguments, the action does keep moving.

What I enjoy, however, is seeing those priceless moments of humanity, like when Peña reassures his daughter she’ll be safe by putting a “magic” cloth over her and later on, when she risks her life to do the same for him, at gunpoint. (Good thing there were blanks--oops! Spoiler Alert!) Here’s this thing about the overall theme of the film: you can’t completely rid racism nor any other declarative method of offense. It’s simply because we like to play the name game and blame whosoever’s name, compared to our own, which does not sound the same. We’re taught to appreciate our mestizo, mullato, whatever-o culture but the truth is, in this live taping of “The Muppets Show,” no one is Kermit or Fozzie or even Miss Piggy (although we are capitalist pigs, in a way, socially.)

No, good friends, I’ll be happy to say that I know for a fact we’re all Gonzos. Noone knows what we are, but we’re all different. And that’s the specific point here, I’m trying to clarify; it doesn’t matter who you are, or whether or not you were mentioned in Michael Jackson’s hit single “Black or White!” We’re all suceptible for downfall, as well as capable of success, therefore, no one is better than the other. Not to sound like Ayn Rand--if anything, this sounds like the antagonists of Rand, but we are all the same and in the end of life, like the beginning of Baz Luhrmann’s rendition of “Wear Sunscreen,” the only person we’re ever trying to really beat in life is ourselves. That’s all there is to it!

Overall, I enjoyed the writing of this film, I plan to read the script and I hope I can equally provoke a young enthusiast-slash-writer somehow, someway, when he/she/it/they study my mentality I’ll be happy to share with the world… where we all ought to have a say.

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