ByChris Moore, writer at Creators.co
Full-time writer and professional movie geek; writer of all things Star Wars, DC and Marvel for the Moviepilot Editorial team. @Irish_CGM
Chris Moore

What would you do if you were convicted of a crime you didn't commit; how would you react?

Making a Murderer follows the story of Steven Avery, who was wrongly convicted of sexual assault and later exonerated after spending eighteen years behind bars. Avery's case later prompted a change in the U.S. criminal justice system and led to the discovery of extreme corruption in local law enforcement. Ultimately his story led to something positive, but the journey he went through is difficult to watch.

The series is harrowing, brutal and actually inspired by true events. Moreover, Netflix are releasing all 10 parts of this tale in one go, so there's no need to wait or limit yourself.

Check out the synopsis below:

"Inspired by a newspaper article from 2005, directors Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos have spent the last decade documenting an unprecedented real-life thriller that spans more than thirty years. Set in America’s Heartland, Making a Murderer follows the harrowing story of Steven Avery, an outsider from the wrong side of the tracks, convicted and later exonerated of a brutal assault. His release triggered major criminal justice reform legislation, and he filed a lawsuit that threatened to expose corruption in local law enforcement and award him millions of dollars. But in the midst of his very public civil case, he suddenly finds himself the prime suspect in a grisly new crime.

The series takes viewers inside a riveting, high-stakes criminal case where reputation is everything and things are never as they appear. The filmmakers have documented every angle of the story, following the second investigation and ensuing trial of the accused, petitioning the court to avoid having to turn over their footage, gathering archival materials, and interviewing those closest to the case."

It has to be noted that the themes discussed in this documentary series are uncomfortable and possibly unsettling for some, however, this point aside, the series is finely crafted to perfection. This story is definitely worth your attention, and serves as the latest in Netflix's string of original documentary content.

Making a Murderer airs on December 18, just in time for Star Wars: The Force Awakens and I'm sure it'll get you in the mood for the holidays. 'Tis the season of giving, so why not give some of your valuable time to this quality Netflix program.

The Innocent Killer.

If you're interested in this topic, why not watch the series, or look into Michael Griesbach's fantastic book: The Innocent Killer, in which he explores much of the same topics covered in Making A Murderer.

The story of one of the nation’s most notorious wrongful convictions, that of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who spent eighteen years in prison for a crime he did not commit. But two years after he was exonerated of that crime and poised to reap millions in his wrongful conviction lawsuit, Steven Avery was arrested for the exceptionally brutal murder of Teresa Halbach, a freelance photographer who had gone missing several days earlier. The “Innocent Man” had turned into a cold blooded killer. Or had he? This is narrative non-fiction at its finest. A true crime thriller.

The Innocent Killer.

The Innocent Killer: Michael Griesbach
The Innocent Killer: Michael Griesbach

If you're interested in this topic, why not watch the series, or look into Michael Griesbach's fantastic book: The Innocent Killer, in which he explores much of the same topics covered in Making A Murderer.

"The story of one of the nation’s most notorious wrongful convictions, that of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who spent eighteen years in prison for a crime he did not commit. But two years after he was exonerated of that crime and poised to reap millions in his wrongful conviction lawsuit, Steven Avery was arrested for the exceptionally brutal murder of Teresa Halbach, a freelance photographer who had gone missing several days earlier. The “Innocent Man” had turned into a cold blooded killer. Or had he? This is narrative non-fiction at its finest. A true crime thriller."

(Source: Deadline, Geektyrant.)

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