ByCourtney Feist, writer at Creators.co

So I'm the first to admit that I'm a sucker for dumb comedy movies that have really great story lines. However, in recent years, the comedy film scene has gone downhill faster than Kiefer Sutherland's receding hairline. Most of the "blockbuster" comedies have been the victims of sub-par overdone fat jokes and sorely lacking actual original plot lines. So when I first saw trailers for Sisters, I had very little hope that the movie would be anything close to being worth the $15 our expensive and overpriced theaters charge their loyal patrons.

Yet, I was pulled in regardless by the unrelenting burning flame that is my love for the of Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. These goddesses paved the way for early millennial comedies with their unforgettable movie of Mean Girls. While this both set a standard, as well as stopped any other movie from achieving the same height, it started a trend for lighthearted genre once again compared to the more dramatic comedies of the nineties. Getting to see these two goof around on the big screen at least once more was enough enticement for my best friend and I to be dragged to the movie.

"We have been friends for, like, 26 years," Tina remarks in unison with Amy's, "-6 years." "I've liked her a lot longer." Amy responds, "And we're like sisters which made it so easy for us to play sisters in our new movie, Star Wars." (Tina and Amy's opening monologue on Saturday Night Live, 12/19/15).
"We have been friends for, like, 26 years," Tina remarks in unison with Amy's, "-6 years." "I've liked her a lot longer." Amy responds, "And we're like sisters which made it so easy for us to play sisters in our new movie, Star Wars." (Tina and Amy's opening monologue on Saturday Night Live, 12/19/15).

{Slight S P O I L E R S Ahead}

At first the movie opens up with Maura Ellis (Amy Poehler) as the younger more reserved daughter of the Ellis family finding out she has to break the bad news to her sister that their childhood home is being put on the market. We're quickly introduced then to the older Ellis, Kate (Tina Fey). From early on, we learn that Kate is the more wild and uncontrollable of the two, having lost her job as well as her having her daughter run away on her. It's obvious that these two women couldn't be any more different, yet they still share this intense bond that I myself could relate to with my own younger sister.

The two reconnect to go back to their home and pack their belongings up, as per wish of their parents. The story then follows the two ladies going through childhood memoirs and remembering how much fun they were as kids. It strikes nostalgia in the two siblings, leading to an idea to have one last huge Ellis Island party with old classmates. The trouble that the two got into really resinated with me as I began thinking of my own childhood and antics that my sister and I got into. The jokes thus far were raunchy yet fitting and conversations I could see my own sibling and I having had done in our own time.

However the party isn't the only plot line that the movie follows, already ticking off one of my own boxes on the decent movie scale. With Kate's loss of motivation in life, the only thing she really owns anymore are her memories, all of which the best happened in her childhood home. When the house is sold to a snooty rich couple from New York, it becomes Kate's determination to trash the house so they won't continue with the sale. The story really delves into the idea of what a childhood home means and how to come to terms with moving on. It made me think of my past year in which I had graduated from hometown high school, packed up and moved 8 hours away to a small college where I didn't know anyone. A lot of the epiphanies the girls' had were thoughts I myself had come to acknowledge in the last year as well, making it really easy for me to relate with Kate.

Most comedies go for the very one dimensional characters that are only in place for laughter, but I felt that both sisters could have been ladies in my life, even myself. The writers and actresses did an excellent job of bringing the characters to life as well as making an entertaining story line. It wasn't hard for me to believe that the Ellis sisters were actually the girl I sat next to in Calc or the girl that took my cousin to prom. There was just something so real about this movie that I couldn't get over how much the movie was advertised as simply a comedy. Sure it wasn't some philosophical masterpiece detailing the human agenda, but it was heartwarming and something I needed in my life right about now. Plus it has that extra kick of fun that really gets you in the mood to crash a party or two. Which helps with it being the season and all. So whether or not you're looking for slapstick or just a good film in general, Sisters is one I would recommend for anyone with a decent sense of humor and good family values. Hopefully we've hit something that'll set another movie goal to shoot for for the next 10 years as well. A New Year's resolution maybe?

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