ByHeath Rezabek, writer at Creators.co
Librarian, writer, and futurist in Austin, TX.

MAJOR UPDATE: April 12, 2016. Now confirmed.

Daisy Ridley Knows Whose Rey's Parents Are, Doesn't Think It's Important

Either way, Ridley found out who Rey's parents were "when [they] were filming VII," and she doesn't think it's very important.

"I think the amazing thing about VII is that Finn and Rey don't come from anywhere, and they find a place. So to me, it's funny that people think it's so important because I don't really think it is," Ridley said of her parentage.

Daisy Ridley Knows Whose Rey's Parents Are, Doesn't Think It's Important

Either way, Ridley found out who Rey's parents were "when [they] were filming VII," and she doesn't think it's very important.

"I think the amazing thing about VII is that Finn and Rey don't come from anywhere, and they find a place. So to me, it's funny that people think it's so important because I don't really think it is," Ridley said of her parentage.


How did I know in December 2015? Read on...


There is a quote by J.J. Abrams which gets to the heart of an important opportunity the new Star Wars saga has seized.

It is one of the main pieces of evidence at hand to suggest that Rey is something far more mysterious than simply another Skywalker.

My feeling is that the Force that has awakened in Star Wars: The Force Awakens is strong in what is in canon called the Living Force, that more mysterious and unpredictable compliment to the more fateful, destiny-driven Cosmic Force.

For me when I heard Obi-Wan say that the Force surrounds us and binds us all together, there was no judgement about who you were. This was something that we could all access. Being strong with the Force didn’t mean something scientific, it meant something spiritual. It meant someone who could believe, someone who could reach down to the depths of your feelings and follow this primal energy that was flowing through all of us. I mean, that’s what was said in that first film! And there I am sitting in the theater at almost 11 years old and that was a powerful notion. And I think this is what your point was, we would like to believe that when s**t gets serious, that you could harness that Force I was told surrounds not just some of us but every living thing. And so, I really feel like the assumption that any character needs to have inherited a certain number of midi-chlorians or needs to be part of a bloodline, it’s not that I don’t believe that as part of the canon, I’m just saying that at 11 years old, that wasn’t where my heart was. And so I respect and adhere to the canon but I also say that the Force has always seemed to me to be more inclusive and stronger than that.

J.J. Abrams on Slashfilm

The galaxy of Star Wars is large enough for many aspects of the Force.

SW:TFA pays due respect to the potency of the Skywalker bloodline through the fateful and cosmically forceful emergence of Kylo Ren. To underline and highlight this aspect of the Force through Rey is both unnecessary and limiting. To instead leave her destiny unshackled by a fateful density dense with midi-chlorians allows the Awakening saga the option of exploring expansive possibilities.

Indeed, it may turn out that to truly make a break with the cycles of fate woven into the past, the patterns of doom which occur and recur far back in the history of the Star Wars galaxy, will take a seismic shift in the way the Force responds to the hopes and dreams of those it is a part of.

If this does turn out to be a theme in the end, it will be a timely and welcomed one.

With the Jedi order in ruins, the chance for its recovery fading, its remnants scattered in exile, this inclusivity is one of the most potent paths to hope for the future of that galaxy.

Rey represents a new beginning in many different ways. Bustle puts its finger on another one, in the clear signs that we needn’t worry Rey will end up pining for Finn.

In a similar way, I believe Rey will remain free to pursue her path through the Living Force, her mind and fate not necessarily written in whole by the patterns of the past. As she says in answer to Maz Kanata’s question in the most mythic and evocative of the trailers (if not in the final film) when asked:

Who are you?

I’m no-one.

While she begins the film as “no-one”, she soon learns that she holds capacities and strengths of which she was unaware. This does not have to mean, however, that those strengths are inherited from someone else’s bloodline.

They just may be arising — or awakening — from within, free and clear.

To backtrack on this aspect of her awakening now would be to scale back the scope of what the Force and its future can hold. And that does not seem to be what the Awakening saga has set out to do.

In a thorough discussion (on Mashable) of the four most prevalent theories on Rey’s background, one woman, a friend of the author and casual SW fan, puts it quite well:

I hope she’s just an ordinary person. Because then, she’s me.

In this goal of opening up the Force for a new generation, Team Abrams has succeeded tremendously thus far. I see no reason to doubt that this expansive approach will continue.

Note: I can't seem to add Comments, (or else the internet is broken), so I'll try adding 'replies' here at this tail end.

- Thanks for the thought on whether or not the original title was a spoiler: Even though I don't feel it was, I've changed it up. (Was: "Rey. More than just another Skywalker? One key clue says yes!")

- Even with all the above said, I have to say there's another fan theory that's been growing on me, due to the potential it opens for Rogue One, and a subsequent Anthology film: that she is a Kenobi.

I still hope she turns out to be a genuine awakening. But if she isn't, I could get behind a Kenobi. ^_--

- To add some fuel to the discussion of the chances for non-bloodline Force-sensitives, I wanted to share the following forgotten tidbit on another new friend, Poe Dameron. In a nutshell, there's a chance that Poe himself is Force-sensitive (look at how he flies!), but not from bloodline.

Does Growing Up Around a Force Tree Make Poe Dameron a Force Sensitive?

This is not movie (though it is print canon): the point to grasp is that the Lucasfilm Story Group (which advises and helps shape the larger tale the films will tell) is thinking in new directions, and that means we should be able to as well. While even the canon comics (as this one is) don't need to be key to a viewer's experience, they can give us clues as to where things are headed. In this case, here's what I take away:

Many strange things are happening in this film, and thus in the future of Star Wars. Much is changing, beneath the face-level similarities. We should be prepared for new things to happen in the story (such as people being strong with the Force due to other things than bloodline) that haven't ever happened before. It is a new era. And there are clues, like this canon comic, that suggest the Story Group is far more open to change than we may yet be! ^_^

- I've written a much longer piece for those interested in diving into the possibilities of Star Wars. Though I plan to break it down into click-sized bits here, that will take awhile. For the curious, my longread on Star Wars, written just before Awakens premiered, is on Medium.

The Living Force of Star Wars: A Victory for All Time

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