ByAslan Hollier, writer at Creators.co
I'm addicted to watching and owning movies. I even love to talk about movies when I'm not watching them. I write movies and I make movies.
Aslan Hollier

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is pulling in all sorts of diverse reviews. Most critics don't like it, most fans love it and others between think it's so-so. If you haven't seen the movie because of critic reviews, then you're ignorant. If you haven't seen it based on reviews that you didn't even actually read,and just look at the rating they give, then you're just plain dumb.

I read reviews before seeing the movie because I didn't really care about the final opinion since I was going to see it no matter what. I read executives gave it a standing ovation on the first screening, then after the premiere critics started ripping it apart for various and commonly ridiculous reasons. I saw the movie and made my own judgement, then read more reviews and I think they are all kinds of jacked up.

While I give my in depth breakdown and review (WITH SPOILERS!), I'm going to integrate some critic reviews to point out how they are wrong, ignorant or simply have no reasonable grounding for their harsh rating.

When I read reviews before seeing the film, the majority of them said that it started off with the Man of Steel reference and angle, but it doesn't. It starts off with one of the biggest "problems" people have with the movie and that's the death of Bruce's parents, Thomas and Martha Wayne (Jeffery Dean Morgan and Lauren Cohan). I have to say I was frustrated knowing I was going to have to see that sequence again, but after seeing the movie I changed my mind for many reasons:

1) I thought it was beautifully and artistically shot.

2) The music was amazing with the visuals.

3) I loved the minor detail twists: the gun catching under the necklace and breaking as he shoots her and Bruce being lifted up by the bats that swarm around him.

4) It set up the tone and feel of the film very well, as well as the "Martha" situation toward the end.

5) I thought the scene was overly done, but my girlfriend, who saw the film with me, had no memory of what happened to Bruce's parents and that the pearl necklace is always used in said scene, but she loved it and thought it helped the film as well.

"On the one hand, it presents us yet again with the robbery-murder of young Bruce Wayne’s parents, perhaps the scene in all popular cinema that least needed to be portrayed anew. (This time, though, his mother’s pearls tumble to the ground in slow motion.) On the other, it presumes that we already know all about Alfred, the Bat Cave and so on."

A critic said that about the scene, but there are a couple of other slightly turned details about the killing that this critic failed to mention. And it does kind of presume we know about Alfred and the Bat Cave because we do, but reiterating the death of his parents (mainly his mother, Martha) has an important significance for the end of the movie. And no one knew Alfred would be helping Bruce/Batman out so much, but we learned that by watching what they did and how they interact.

Then, after we catch up with Bruce's childhood, we see Bruce's angle of the destruction during the Zod and Superman battle in Man of Steel. You can watch an awesome mash-up video here and I'm sure that will explain itself and how well done the new scene was shot. The timing is very nice and I loved seeing another angle. I thought it tied everything together and gave the reason why Bruce/Batman (Ben Affleck) is the way he is toward Superman in this movie. The visual of Bruce running into the debris shows his dedication for saving people. Ben Affleck had me sold right from the beginning (Honestly, he had me before seeing the film. Read about that here). I read many people feel the same. People hated on him for being cast, but now everyone accepts it and enjoys it.

Ben as Bruce and Bruce in animated series
Ben as Bruce and Bruce in animated series

I was, however, disappointed in learning the role of Wallace Keefe (Scoot McNairy) in the film. Wallace ends up having his legs amputated because they were crushed by debris from the Superman and Zod battle, so, that is how the people of Metropolis start thinking negatively of Superman.

After all of that we see some people enter Zod's ship in the water and discover Kryptonite, which is later brought to Luthor.

Lois Lane (Amy Adams) is now in Africa talking with people, but then Luthor's guy, Anatoli Knyazev (played by Callen Mulvey) kills some of the Africans and the African leader takes Lois hostage, who is then saved by Superman (Henry Cavill). This is an important scene because we see how Luthor's men are everywhere getting all the information, and is testing Superman's dedication to saving specifically Lois Lane (enemies discover a flaw/weakness). This is also how Lois finds a special bullet which leads her down her own long and ridiculous subplot path. Yes, this was probably the worst part of the film in my opinion. I think Lois's character was pretty much useless and could have been condensed down. I mean, at least an hour of the movie her character was trying to find out who made the bullet, and, of course, we find Luthor is behind it.

We have a court scene and a romantic bathtub scene with Clark and Lois. Just some fluff and filler. Which every movie has some, not a huge deal. It does help show a more human side to Clark because of his relationship with Lois and the court scene starts the controversy with The People (Scoot) v Superman.

Now, enter Batman! This scene was awesome. You automatically get a sense of how dark Batman is now. Hostages who are being saved are scared of him and the police are terrified as they search for him. Very suspenseful feel, then we see Batman hiding in the corner of the ceiling behind the officer, which was a great image.

That's the one.
That's the one.

Batman has even resorted to branding criminals "which is like the death penalty in prison". This all is a great set-up for Batman/Bruce's character and the way he is now after 20 years of being Batman. Wayne Manor is even in shambles, which raises my question, what happened? I think that is a question that was left open for a reason and perhaps to be touched on in the extended version, Suicide Squad or The Justice League.

Branding.
Branding.

Alfred (Jeremy Irons), seen as Batman's partner and tech person. Which is how it is in some comic versions and makes complete sense to me. I'm also a fan of Jeremy's voice, so, he's a great one to have telling Batman the things he does. Speaking of voice, they also address and have a voice modulator that Bruce wears as Batman. I think that's great because it helps as the character and also keeps the audience from judging Ben on his "Batman voice" which was all talked about during The Dark Knight Trilogy with Christian Bale. Nipped that in the butt. During this scene we also get the dark depressing nature of Bruce. The entrance into the Bat Cave was also awesome to me and reminded me of Tim Burton's Batman.

Bruce and Alfred
Bruce and Alfred

Enter Alexander Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). In his intro it shows he's a bit off kilter. He has access to the Kryptonite and you know he has some big plans. He also has a line that says, "my father is the Lex in front of the Corp", which arises some questions. Lex Luthor started his company himself from the very beginning.

So, since the real Lex Luthor started his own company, then is Lex in this movie, in fact, Lex Luthor Jr.? Or have they changed some backstory on the character?

Questions that I hope are answered more clearly in later films. I'm sure there's a reason for that line. I also do believe that Lex does have his own character arc in the film. He gets a little crazier, but then you wonder if he really knows more than you think. He does and he seems to have a backup plan for everything, which is how Lex is supposed to be.

"maniacally evil Lex Luthor, seems to be trying to do something different with his role: He lets you see the wires short-circuiting inside the villain’s head when he schemes. But the movie has no use for him other than as a plot device, a mechanism to set certain events in motion, with no apparent motivation."

Yes, you need plot devices to move stories along, and Lex does have motivation. He wants to have the upper hand and Superman and Batman keep him from having that. He is trying to get rid of them without actually being involved. That's why he tries to set them up to kill each other, but when that falls through, Lex uses his back-up plan. Seems like motivation enough.

Wallace then desecrates Superman's statue with spray paint to say "False God". That statue is referenced in the trailer. This bit brings in more trouble to Superman from the people.

Lex finds Zod's ship in a facility, gets Zod's body and removes his fingerprints with a Kryptonite blade. Some of these scene cuts back and forth with Lex in different places was a bit confusing.

We see Bruce at a fight, I'm guessing that's how he gambles. It shows an interesting and aggressive side to Bruce. While he's there Lex's goon copies Bruce's phone and Bruce notices.

Lex shows he will do whatever it takes to get what he wants. There's a bit with a painting of angels and demons, Lex tells Finch (Holly Hunter) to flip it, "We know better now, don't we? Devils don't come from hell beneath us. No, they come from the sky".

Remember that, because it comes back later, as well as the interaction, Lex -"Do you know the oldest lie in America, Senator? Can I call you June?"

Senator Finch- "You can call me whatever you like. Take a bucket of piss and call it Granny's Peach Tea; take a weapon of assassination and call it deterrence. You won't fool a fly or me. I'm not gonna drink it."

Bruce's nightmare, or vision, comes in slowly so that we the audience think it's real. Bruce toward the graves of his parents and this black ooze comes from the walls and this creature breaks out and screeches, then Bruce wakes up.

What was that creature?

I looked up some pictures and came to a conclusion where I began to wonder if this was referencing Dracula and the Vampires, which may also explain why Wayne Manor is in shambles. You can read more and see what I'm talking about here. Was there or will there be a Vampire Batman?

This is what the creatures face looked like to me.
This is what the creatures face looked like to me.

As the movie continues we see Lois still going on about the bullet. Then, we see more interaction between Bruce and Alfred, and Bruce stares down the Bat Suit and walks by and glances over at the Robin costume in the case.

Bruce staring down the suit.
Bruce staring down the suit.
Robin's suit in the case. Killed by Joker (maybe)
Robin's suit in the case. Killed by Joker (maybe)
The comic version.
The comic version.

We get to the first scene with everyone it together. Bruce and Clark talk about Superman and Batman. We see they are both against what the other stands for, and Lex comes in and clearly seems like he's got a secret plan. Lex gives an odd speech that no one in the room understands and we question his sanity. Bruce (not so sneakily) goes downstairs to place some tech to get information of Lex's computer. Clark follows because he can hear Alfred talking to Bruce in his ear, but then Clark gets distracted by the TV and leaves to save people. Bruce later finds Diana Prince (Gal Gadot) stole his shit and gets away. And we see Superman saving different people in various ways and they have TV bits of real people, like Neil Tyson DeGrassi, talking about Superman, which brings the movie down to the real present world that we (the audience) live. There are some cool visuals like the Day of the Dead people reaching out, and the girl on the rooftop looking reaching up to him. I thought all of that was a little long and unnecessary, but I understand they were trying to show the people that Superman is still good.

Lex finds Wallace and offers him an upgrade on his wheelchair in order for his help with the Senator. Clark wants to write about Batman, but no one cares. Bruce meets up with Diana Prince to talk about the tech. She stole it because she was looking for a picture Lex has of her, but she didn't find it, and gives Bruce his tech back. This was a great interaction, but reminded me a lot of the interaction between Christian Bale and Anne Hathaway in The Dark Knight Rises, which is hard to escape when you have Christopher Nolan (Director of Dark Knight Trilogy) as an Executive Producer and David S. Goyer (Writer of Dark Knight Trilogy and Man of Steel) as the Writer.

Shot from "Knightmare" scene
Shot from "Knightmare" scene

Bruce now sits at his computer and starts decrypting the information, when suddenly he looks as if he sees something horrific. Cut to "Knightmare" scene.

Batman in a warzone and desert place. A big Omega symbol lies on the ground, which is a sign of Darkseid.

"Batman imagines he’s in a future realm in which Superman and his fellow evil aliens have conquered the world. That scene, which is shot in one long take, is weird and exciting and strange, a brief glimpse at the bolder, more original movie Snyder is capable of making."

Batman goes to retrieve Kryptonite from a truck, but it's a trap and the cloaked figures around are Superman soldiers with guns. They begin to kill people and attack Batman. Batman fights, shoots and breaks necks in this awesome sequence. These things that look like parademons start flying around and taking people away, then one knocks out Batman as he is held down.

Parademons
Parademons
Parademons with Darkseid
Parademons with Darkseid
What does The Joker have to do with this?
What does The Joker have to do with this?

Batman is chained, Superman lands, kills other captives with his laser eyes and removes Batman's cowl to reveal he is Bruce Wayne. Superman says, "She was my world. Then you took her from me." Also note that Darkseid has the power to posses people, which can bring other thoughts about these segments. Read more of that here.

Superman proceeds to put his hand on Bruce's chest and Bruce screams. Bruce wakes up at his computer with flashes and smoke in front of him and someone, who appears to be The Flash (Ezra Miller) speaks to him.

Pictures of that sequence.
Pictures of that sequence.

Who is "him"? Superman or Lex? Was that "Knightmare" sequence all from Bruce or was it visions from The Flash? That might explain the horrific look Bruce gave at the computer before it cuts away. And The Flash scene can't be a dream because afterward papers are still flying. Topic of big discussion, which is what Zack Snyder wanted from what I understand.

Flash and Batman in comics
Flash and Batman in comics
"Nothing means anything in “Batman V Superman,” with multiple dream sequences existing merely to mix up the color palette and provide some money shots for the ad campaign."

That's a quote from one critic. Seeing as how this little bit about the Flash is the last nightmare, dream, vision or whatever you want to call it right now, then I don't think this quote stands at all. We see small bits from one "dream sequence" in the trailer, and all of sequences like it have meaning and purpose, the critic just didn't care to think or look into it enough. Read their full review here.

Back to the movie, Clark gets pictures from someone (Lex) of Batman's "justice", which fuels his fire. Bruce talks with Alfred about going after Superman and says the line “20 years in Gotham and how many good guys are there? How many stayed that way?” A big point of the movie and does resonate the The Dark Knight's line "You either die a hero or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain". Alfred also has a line of “Everything's changed. Men fall from the sky, the gods hurl thunderbolts, innocents die. That's how it starts, sir. The fever, the rage, the feeling of powerlessness that turns good men... cruel." Basic line to fit the whole movie and it's characters.

Batman and his car
Batman and his car

The Batmobile gets some action, then we see the first interaction between Batman and Superman to bring the "do you bleed" line, Lex gets his Kryptonite, Wallace and Senator Finch ask for Superman to show himself and Superman talks with his mother, Martha (Diane Keaton), and she tells him he doesn't owe people anything.

Bruce finds Wallace, who worked for Wayne Enterprises, has been denying checks from him and speaking up in court and in the media about going against Superman. Lex talks with the Senator and she goes into court. Superman shows up in the court, Senator notices some nasty liquid in a mason jar labeled "Granny's Peach Tea" and that Lex isn't in the room. Then, the building blows up as Superman stands among the fire. Bruce gets another letter, but this one says "You let your family die". Another ploy by Lex to get Bruce pumped at the same time he watches the news to see the explosion.

Bruce steals Kryptonite from Lex and Lex uses Zod's fingerprints to get into a part of a broken ship and locates The Archives of Krypton which "has knowledge of 100 different worlds" to which Lex responds, "teach me". Lex wants to create Doomsday.

Bruce works out showing what the real Batman should look like, and then he finds Diana Prince's photo, where she is in Belgium in 1918, which Bruce later sends to her showing her that he knows. Lex puts Zod's body in the water, cuts his hand and bleeds on it to start the Doomsday creation.

Clark's mom gets kidnapped and Clark is up in the snowy mountains talking to his dead dad. That scene threw me off a bit. All of a sudden Batman is now in his steel suit with a Kryptonite spear. That was very sudden and I feel like there's a chunk missing from this section because that was a big jump and it caught me off guard. I want to see more of the creation of the suit or something. At least show it at some point so we know he has it, and not just suddenly wearing it.

Lex has Lois on the roof and pushes her off, only for her to be saved by Superman, which is what is intended because as Superman comes back up, Lex starts a timer and gives his spiel about killing Batman or the woman he cares most for will die. It's not Lois, it's "every boys special woman. His mother." Superman agrees and tells Lois he has to kill Batman and says "no one stays good in this world".

Diana Prince gets information from Bruce and opens up the files on the metahumans: Aquaman (Jason Momoa), whose footage was very disappointing, Flash, stupid basic footage, and Cyborg (Ray Fisher), whose footage was longer and really cool where this gooey cube thing formed to Cyborg's body, which makes him start screaming. That cube thing, I believe is a "Mother Box" or "Father Box" which is an Apokoliptian element, from Darkseid's home planet. It's a bunch of tiny supercomputers (or nanities). They can attach to people and things to work wonders. This situation follows more of Cyborg in the New 52.

"As its subtitle announces, Batman v Superman is a setup for Snyder’s upcoming Justice League movie, in conscious apery of the world-building that Marvel Studios has been undertaking for almost a decade. But whereas Marvel produced five superhero features before assembling its heroes in The Avengers, Warner Bros. has no such patience with its DC properties. (Justice League Part One is due out next year.) Nowhere is this impatience more evident than in a remarkably lame narrative shortcut in which Bruce Wayne happens upon a “metahuman” supercut of footage that introduces Wonder Woman, the Flash, Aquaman, and Cyborg in the course of approximately two minutes."

This critic compares DC to Marvel, which shouldn't be done. Yes Marvel paved the way for the movie universe concept, but that doesn't mean DC has to do everything the same way. They're changing it up. We will still see individual movies for the members of the Justice League, but just not leading up to it. They're movies will roll off of what happens in the Justice League movie. I think that's a great thing to do. Otherwise, critics would slam DC for copying Marvel to a T. I thought this introduction was clever and saves time. Read that review here.

Lois hitches a ride to the Bat Signal, which is just across the bay. I never realized that Metropolis and Gotham were so close, but I guess they both are a part of NYC, so, it does make sense even though it's never been addressed in this way.

The Batman and Superman showdown. I thought it was really cool and fun to watch this whole sequence. I don't know why people say there wasn't humor because during this fight there was an "Oh shit" moment from Batman that made me chuckle. I loved Batman tying Superman's feet and flinging him around the room as he talked about the differences in their parents (which I found slightly humorous).

Then, while Superman is pinned down he says the “he's gonna kill Martha”. Which clicks in Bruce's head because his mother's name is Martha. It may seem like Batman suddenly changes without reason, but I think it's all legit. It's a defining turning point for him. He realizes that Superman does have more weaknesses than just Kryptonite, and it brings them both down to a relatable level. Bruce knows how it is for someone to lose their mother and he's been tormented over it. Why make a choice to continue to be a bad guy when you now realize Superman isn't really the bad guy, it's all on Lex. It's a moment where Batman realizes he needs to stop acting like a child and do what is right and what he is supposed to do, especially after Lois comes in and helps.

An article that helps explain this issue and a few more can be read here.

Bruce received a message from Flash about Lois, so, he knows he has/is supposed to help Superman. But this is where I also thought the flashback of his parents wasn't really needed. They should have made a choice to only show it at the beginning or show it in inserts such as this moment. Personally, I would have kept the beginning since it was beautifully done, and it gets that bit of information out of the way, so it doesn't come in the middle and ruin the moment.

One critic had this to say about the Batman and Superman showdown.

"When the title fight finally goes down, it’s less fireworks display, more cannonball to the testicles. Never mind that Bats and Supes don’t have any good reason to be fighting, or that Gotham and Metropolis are conveniently located next door to each other, or that the scuffle’s resolution is something out of a soon-to-be-canceled soap opera, it’s little more than loud noises and flying fists – a predictably angsty scuffle that’s sure to end in a draw."

I'm not exactly sure what they're trying to say, but yes it's a grounded fight between Batman and Superman, rather than a lot of fancy explosions, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. It's also not the movie's fault that, in fact, Metropolis and Gotham are in close proximity to each other. Metropolis is like NYC and Gotham is a part of Manhattan. Yes, the fight ends in a draw, but it understandably comes to that conclusion.

Batman then uses his skills and tech to save Martha, which was a really cool scene with great action, and having Alfred helping out with controls from afar worked awesomely. It feels like it's the way it should have been from the very beginning.

Superman gets to Lex as the timer dings. Lex learns that neither Batman nor Superman are dead, so, bring in Doomsday. Lex always has a back-up plan.

Doomsday
Doomsday

Doomsday fight! Really cool, but it was oddly convenient that every time there's destruction there are no people around to have innocent casualties. Not sure if it hurts or helps that the characters address it in the dialog. There was another humorous "Oh shit" moment from Batman before he starts to run away from Doomsday cause he realize he's no match for the monster.

The image of Superman bringing Doomsday to space was really cool. Government fires nuclear weapons (of course, but at least no people are around, right? Lol). Too bad the nuclear weapons make Doomsday stronger, since he adapts to what tries to kill him. I loved seeing him transform. And Superman looked crazy floating in space looking old, wrinkly and like shit.

Wonder Woman
Wonder Woman

Enter Wonder Woman! Her music was so awesome here, I literally started pumping my fist in the air at the theater. (Why did Hans Zimmer have to stop doing superhero movies?) I think this trio makes a great team. I'm glad I got more of Diana Prince/Wonder Woman than I thought I would. Gal Gadot was great and I look forward to her solo film.

"That honour goes to Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman, a character invented in 1941 and only now making her big-screen debut. Gadot’s dramatic powers remain to be tested, but she at least makes a big impact in the final reel’s showdown, unleashing her Lasso Of Truth and power-sliding all over the place. It’s a landmark moment in cinema, executed well."

I really thought Lois would die. Loved how they defeated Doomsday as a team, Wonder Woman holding him with her lasso, Batman shooting the Kryptonite spray and Superman flying in with the Kryptonite spear. I don't really remember Marvel having that kind of teamwork. In Marvel there are too many enemies with too much going on, but this is a lot more focused, which is refreshing.

"From there, though, the glum only grows while the plot fractures into a thousand shards until, finally, Doomsday arrives to destroy everything rebuilt in the 18 months that have passed since Man of Steel. Snyder, unlike, say, Jon Favreau or Joss Whedon or James Gunn or the other Marvels, doesn't really seem to like the "comic" part of comic books. To him it's all metaphor and portent, Sturm und Drang. In the words of The Joker in a far better Batman movie: "Why so serious?"

That said, Affleck's Batman is the closest we've seen on screen to Frank Miller's nasty Dark Knight, the aged and anguished crime-fighter who, when he debuted 30 years ago, reinvented the comic book and provided the template for Tim Burton and Chris Nolan's big-screen renditions. Writer David S. Goyer and re-writer Chris Terrio (Affleck'sArgo-to man) lift whole scenes from Miller's 1986 comic book for Batman v Superman -- the fight sequences, of course, but also the parade of talking heads on small screens commenting on the action (here, they range from Anderson Cooper to Neil deGrasse Tyson)."

I don't understand why this critic is implying that all "comic book" movies should have "comic" relief throughout the whole thing, and then go to compare it to lifting scenes straight from comics. The point is that this is a comic book movie and it did a great job for fans to compare it to comics. Whether or not the movie has comedy doesn't make it less of a comic book movie.

"Which is why it’s a shame that Snyder feels the need to throw in a hulking, city-smashing Uruk-hai afterwards. A climax to a climax, it’s CGI overkill, making for a generic and exhausting denouement."

The movie was not CGI overkill. Avengers is CGI overkill. Ex: Hulkbuster suit is not real.No one was in that suit. And Robert Downey Jr. wears a onesie with computer dots. Batman's steel suit is real. Ben was in that suit interacting. That's true work.

I like that they went the “Superman is dead” route. I also enjoyed how they didn't bring him back in this movie. Batman coming out of the smoke and standing there with Wonder Woman while Superman lays dead was a great image.

Lex gets his head shaved to look more official.

I'm not sure how I felt about Perry White (Laurence Fishburne) seeing the paper where Superman and Clark Kent were missing and die at the same time.

The creepy bit with Lex and the “ding ding he's coming” thing was great. And Batman's entrance into his cell was perfect.

Scene with Batman and Lex.
Scene with Batman and Lex.

I was happy to see that the demon and angel painting had been flipped by this point.

I really, really enjoyed the end with Bruce/Batman being the leader and aimed for collecting the team together for whatever is coming (Darkseid?), and then that final image of the dirt rising from the coffin was a fantastic ending.

Death of Superman
Death of Superman

The most disappointing thing of the whole film was not having end credit scene.

I thought the movie was very well paced. It didn't seem that long at all, and I thought most of everything in the movie needed to be there. It's a fantastic comic book movie and that's what Zack Snyder says he set out to do, and I believe it was achieved. Zack also brings up Star Wars in his movies defense. Read that here.

I actually wanted more, which is why I anxiously await the extended edition that is now up for Pre-order here if you want to jump on it (I did). I think the deleted scenes for this film will be worth the watch, like LOTR, but unlike Star Wars Episode VII.

"But it unpacks too much material for even a 2½-hour film, leaving Dawn of Justice a superpowered jumble at times."

I feel that how I described the movie, it doesn't feel the way this critic says, does it? I thought Avengers 2 seemed like more of a crammed jumbled mess with loads of CGI than this movie had. I want more than 21/2 hours just because I want more, not because I need more.

Some reviewers give the movie a bad grade and go off on tangents in their reviews, like this one:

"Much of the movie is spent in Paris—specifically, at the Louvre. Sokurov’s “Russian Ark” (2002) was a magniloquent tribute to the Hermitage, in St. Petersburg, and, to judge by the latest film, his fascination with our need to build strongholds of art, and to weatherproof them against the storms of revolution and conflict, remains undimmed. “Where would we be without museums?” the voice inquires. (It is Sokurov himself speaking, on our behalf.) His camera stops to gaze at portraits, peering close enough to inspect cracks in the pigment, while actors playing Marianne (the traditional figurehead of France) and Napoleon stroll through the empty galleries. “C’est moi,” Bonaparte declares, beside the vast portrayal of his coronation. Then comes the Mona Lisa. “C’est moi,” he says again. There are jokes in Sokurov, but they tend to be lugubrious, muffled in the drapery of the past."

Yes these are labeled as "critics" and what people are basing their opinions on whether or not to see the movie. I hope my article encourages you to, at least, see the movie and make your own judgements, but don't expect it to be like Marvel.

I have come to understand the if you are not a fan of the comics and such, then somethings in this film may be a miss, but hopefully I made things a little better/easier for you all to enjoy the movie, or enjoy it even more.

I also hope this breakdown helped the movie seem a little less disjointed to those who saw the movie that way. The original cut was apparently 4 hours long, but how many people would have said, "screw that, I'm not going to see it if it's that long". I would have seen it, probably alone, but real fans would've went. The movie may have made half the money they did though. I think WB made the right choice with having it cut down like this, then get people excited about the extended cut. I mean, did you see The Watchman as the Director's Cut? So much better!

As a note, I love Marvel and will see Captain America: Civil War opening weekend, but DC and Marvel really are two separate universes with seperate feels, like day and night. They shouldn't be like one another. If you want light hearted humor in a DC movie, then you need Flash or Green Lantern. Those seem to be the most light hearted and funny characters, others have their own set of humor. For instance, I expect Suicide Squad to have some Joker humor, but most may not find it genuinely funny, but funny in a dark messed up way, which is fine with me. That way if DC and Marvel do make a movie together, then it will be that more glorious to see them contrast on the screen.

The cast defends the reviews here and here.

Reviews as of 4-11-16

Rotten Tomatoes 28% Critic (316 votes[90 fresh and 226 rotten]) and 69% Fan (196,178 votes) (3.7 out of 5)

IMDb 7.2 out of 10 (237,369 users) Meta score 44/100 (51 critics) Metacritic.com

Fandango Critics 44 out of 100 (10 critics) and Fans 4 out of 5 stars (32,680 votes)

I give is 4.5 out of 5.

I might also add that on Rotten Tomatoes the critics have Sharknado at 86% and the reason for that high rating is because it is, in fact, a "craptastic movie". Take from that what you will.

We will soon see Batman in Suicide Squad when that comes out on August 26, 2016.

Now, it has been confirmed that Ben Affleck with write, direct and star in a solo Batman movie, and two "Unknown" features has opened up slots in the DC Movie Universe.

Suicide Squad
Suicide Squad
The Joker
The Joker

It's been said that Warner Bros. is spending millions of dollars on re-shoots on Suicide Squad to add more humor, or action. Many complain about the lack of humor in BvS, but it's good that way. DC is dark and gritty and Marvel is lighthearted and fun. Keep them separate. DC doesn't have to be like Marvel.

We will see Wonder Woman's movie June 2, 2017. Followed by Justice League Part 1 November 17, 2017 that started filming this month!

Wonder Woman and the Amazons
Wonder Woman and the Amazons
Actors in Justice League (No Green Lantern)
Actors in Justice League (No Green Lantern)
Justice League (Ours won't have Green Lantern)
Justice League (Ours won't have Green Lantern)

A deleted scene has come up and brings some closure and clarity to the capture of Lex. But it arises, who is this alien villain in the clip?

Or maybe Brainiac? A Different version of Darkseid? He does have three "Mother Boxes" (which is what forms to Cyborg in his clip), so, it should be Darkseid or his father Yuga Khan.

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