ByKit Simpson Browne, writer at Creators.co
Staff Writer, Superheroes, Star Wars and such. Bad jokes aplenty. Can be gently prodded on Twitter at @kitsb1
Kit Simpson Browne

(Warning: The following contains a handful of moderately sized SPOILERS for Captain America: Civil War, albeit primarily ones that appear in the film's first act. If you haven't yet seen the movie, then proceed with whatever level of caution that suggests to you is wise...)

Now, for a movie that features 'Civil War' in its title, Captain America: Civil War bears surprisingly little resemblance to Marvel's iconic comic-book story-line of the same name. Sure, the film is technically an adaptation of 2006-2007's Mark Millar-penned crossover event Civil War, but in practice, the cinematic version takes very little from the original, bar its central premise of Marvel superheroes fighting over the right thing to do. As it turns out, though...

Captain America: Civil War Did Manage To Sneak In A Very Particular Comic-Book Moment

Specifically, the distinctly iconic scene - from way back in 2007's J. Michael Straczynski-scribed Amazing Spider-Man #537, a Civil War tie-in - in which Cap quoted Mark Twain, and managed to leave an entire generation of comic-book fans pretending that they had something in their eye. Y'know, this one:

Now, in the final few lines there, Cap stops quoting Twain, and instead delivers an impassioned plea for free, thoughtful and principled action:

"Doesn't matter what the press says. Doesn't matter what the politicians or the mobs say. Doesn't matter if the whole country decides that something wrong is something right. This nation was founded on one principle above all else: The requirement that we stand up for what we believe, no matter the odds or the consequences. When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree besides the river of truth, and tell the whole world - 'No, you move.'"

Which, as a definition of exactly what Captain America stands for, is pretty darn on the money.

So, Did Cap Deliver That Speech in Captain America: Civil War, then?

Well, as it happens, no, he didn't. Which actually makes a lot of sense in context. With Captain America: Civil War already having to got to quite a lot of trouble to avoid making Tony Stark the villain of the piece, giving Cap an impassioned speech about the nature of American exceptionalism would probably have thrown the whole movie out of whack.

However, that doesn't mean we didn't still get to hear a fragment of it. Y'see...

(Note: This is where the aforementioned SPOILERS really start to kick in...)

Someone Else Delivered Part of Cap's Iconic Speech in Captain America: Civil War

Specifically (and I'm going to SPOILER-protect this part, just in case you didn't actually mean to read this far down the page)...

...Sharon 'Agent 13' Carter, as played by Emily VanCamp. Who, while speaking at her great-aunt Peggy Carter's funeral early on in the movie, just so happens to substantially quote, and gently riff on, Cap's iconic comic-book speech.

Which, as it turns out, works almost - though inevitably not quite - as well as it does on the page.

Nicely played, Civil War. You managed to get something in my eye AGAIN.

What do you reckon, though?

Poll

Do you think Cap should have been allowed to deliver his iconic line himself?