ByKatie Granger, writer at Creators.co
MP Staff Writer, come to bargain.
Katie Granger

**WARNING: MAJOR SPOILERS ahead for Captain America: Civil War.**

For a movie that takes its name from a polarizing arc of the Marvel comics, [Captain America: Civil War](tag:994409) actually strays pretty far from its source material. But like all good comic book movies, it still contains more than its fair share of Easter Eggs — that is, nods toward the pages from which the story sprang, some more subtle than others.

How many did you catch? Here's our rundown of our favorite comic-book-related Easter Eggs and references from Captain America: Civil War, in more or less chronological order. Just a reminder, though — this post contains a lot of spoilers pertaining to the movie, so if you haven't seen it yet, make like Cap and get outta here!

Just say nope to spoilers.
Just say nope to spoilers.

Vasily Karpov

We're first introduced to the Winter Soldier's handler Vasily in the flashback that opens the film, again in the present day when Baron Zemo tracks him down to steal the code book, and finally in another flashback when Bucky talks about the other sleeper soldiers.

Karpov as he appears in the comic books.
Karpov as he appears in the comic books.

In the comics, Karpov is a minor, but very important character, as he's the one who turns Bucky into the Winter Soldier due to his personal vendetta against Captain America. Poor Bucky. You can read more about Karpov here.

Crossbones

We didn't see a whole lot of Crossbones in Civil War, due to him getting very dead very quickly as the movie opened.

But there's a few nods to his comic book counterpart, particularly his choice of weapons: The spring-loaded blades built into his gauntlets, his primary weapons in the comics.

Crossbones vs Cap.
Crossbones vs Cap.

And the fact that he comes very close to killing Captain America is a big nod to the post-Civil War story arc The Death of Captain America, as Crossbones and a brainwashed Sharon Carter assassinate Steve Rogers while he's in S.H.I.E.L.D. custody.

Redwing

The comic book Falcon has a telepathic link with birds. He uses this power to communicate with and see through the eyes of Redwing, a highly trained hunting falcon who often joins Sam Wilson in battle.

Falcon, Cap and Redwing.
Falcon, Cap and Redwing.

There was no bird whispering in Civil War, but we did see an updated take on Redwing in the form of Falcon's drone, which Black Widow refuses to say thank you to during the battle in Lagos. Rude.

The Big Bang

The spark point for the government bringing the Sokovia Accords hammer down upon the Avengers happens in Lagos, when Scarlet Witch attempts to protect Cap from Crossbones' bomb blast.

Reacting on instinct, she deflects the blast upward and it explodes out — effectively destroying a building and killing many innocent civilians.

Elizabeth Olsen is Scarlet Witch.
Elizabeth Olsen is Scarlet Witch.

This nods toward the inciting incident in the comic books, which occurs when supervillain Nitro is cornered by Namorita, who taunts him until he explodes, thus killing Namorita along with members of the New Warriors — and 600 bystanders, including 60 children. This became known as the Stamford incident and kicked off the events of the Civil War.

Miriam (Sharpe)

A secondary character taken directly from the Civil War comic books, Miriam appears as the grieving mother who confronts Tony Stark following his speech at MIT.

In the comic books, Miriam confronts Tony at a memorial service for the 60 children killed in the Stamford incident, of which her son Damien was one of the victims, and she spits in Tony's face and blames him for the deaths.

Miriam confronts Tony Stark.
Miriam confronts Tony Stark.

It's a very important moment in both the comics and the movie, as this incident is a big contributor to Tony's decision to back the Accords.

'No, You Move'

One of Steve Rogers' finest speeches is recreated by Sharon Carter in her touching eulogy to her aunt Peggy Carter during her funeral. Sharon perfectly paraphrases Cap's famous "no, you move" speech, with the words being attributed to Peggy.

The Amazing Spider-Man, Issue 537.
The Amazing Spider-Man, Issue 537.

Given it's this moment that convinces Cap to stick to his guns and go against the Accords, it's a touching moment and a lovely send-off for Peggy, showing that she stays with him even in death. We're not crying, you're crying.

T'Chaka

The death of his father T'Chaka was a huge moment in the life of T'Challa/Black Panther. Not only did he lose his dad and have to take on the responsibility of being the King of Wakanda, but this incident also created a lifelong archenemy for T'Challa in the form of Ulysses Klaw — the Vibranium-stealing mercenary who killed his father.

T'Challa avenges his father.
T'Challa avenges his father.

In Civil War it's not Klaw who kills T'Chaka, but Zemo as part of his scheme to frame Bucky. We met Klaw — Ulysses Klaue in the MCU — in Avengers: Age of Ultron with a Wakandian brand on his neck, so surely he'll be back for the Black Panther solo movie.

Everett Ross

Another Black Panther nod is Martin Freeman's Everett Ross, the man brought in to act as government liaison to the Avengers, as he's an ally of T'Challa from the comics.

He's also kind of a tool.
He's also kind of a tool.

The comic book Ross was a US State Department employee assigned to escort T'Challa when in America, and the two end up forming a partnership of sorts as they foil multiple threats to Wakanda.

The Winter Soldier(s)

The red herring of the narrative was of course Baron Zemo's fake out, as he manipulated events to suggest he intended to unleash the other winter soldiers trained by Bucky and Karpov — the "psycho assassins" as Scott Lang calls them. Instead Zemo kills them all in their sleep, using them as a lure to draw Captain America, Iron Man and Bucky to the Siberian Hydra base.

The Winter Soldier, Vol 1.
The Winter Soldier, Vol 1.

This was a nod to Ed Brubaker's Captain America: Winter Soldier Volume 1, which sees Bucky and Black Widow hunting down sleeper agents trained by Bucky after their stasis tubes are sold on the black market.

Somebody's Gonna Get It!

During the Leipzig/Halle Airport battle, Ant-Man gets propelled into the air and into Iron Man's suit by hitching a ride on one of Hawkeye's arrows — a pretty direct reference to the front cover of Avengers Issue 223.

Avengers Issue 223
Avengers Issue 223

Iron Spider Armor

We'd been pretty sure ever since we saw Spider-Man in action in the second Civil War trailer that the nifty suit he was sporting likely came from Tony Stark, and that was exactly what happened in the movie.

This is likely a reference to the Iron Spider armor made by Stark for Peter Parker; the suit that he discards when changing sides during the Civil War battle in the comics.

Spider-Man in the Iron Spider suit.
Spider-Man in the Iron Spider suit.

'Give Me Back My Rhodey!'

During the Leipzig Airport battle, Vision attempts to bring down Falcon, but distracted, he hits War Machine in the chest plate with an energy beam, shorting out his suit. Rhodey falls to Earth and, despite the efforts of both Iron Man and Falcon to reach him, hits the ground hard enough to fracture his spine, causing long-lasting damage that we see later in the movie.

This combines two incidents from Civil War: The martyring of Goliath and Vision's big panel scene from the final battle. In Civil War 4 Goliath/Bill Foster is killed by Ragnarok — the robot-cyborg clone of Thor, created by Mr. Fantastic.

Goliath's death was a major spark point in the war.
Goliath's death was a major spark point in the war.

His death marks a major turn in the tone of the war, with it being the main contributor to Spider-Man's decision to defect to Team Cap.

It also recalls the scene in which Vision — who is Team Cap in the comics — materializes through Iron Man's chest plate to disable his armor momentarily, allowing Cap to gain the upper hand and turn the battle in his favor.

Vision takes down Iron Man.
Vision takes down Iron Man.

The Raft/Prison 42

In the Civil War comics, Iron Man, Mr. Fantastic and Hank Pym establish a prison in the Negative Zone, which they dub Prison 42 due to the fact that it was the 42nd idea the three worked on together since the beginning of the war.

Prison 42 was a controversial move, as it was used to contain nonregistering superheroes, and was a large part of the reason why Spider-Man changed sides.

Spider-Man leaves Team Cap.
Spider-Man leaves Team Cap.

In the movie, Prison 42 is replaced by the Raft, is a holding facility based off the coast of New York in the comic books. The Raft was typically only used to hold superpowered criminals, not heroes. It was also known as Spider-Island Two, dubbed as such by Spider-Man himself.

Captain Bucky?

As mentioned earlier, Steve Rogers is assassinated by Crossbones and Sharon Carter following the events of Civil War in the books (don't worry, he comes back later). Following this Bucky takes up the mantle of Captain America, until he passes it on again to Sam Wilson.

Cap hands the mantle to Bucky in Captain America Reborn
Cap hands the mantle to Bucky in Captain America Reborn

There's a nod to this during the final battle between Captain America, Bucky and Iron Man, when Bucky picks up and uses Cap's shield against Tony. Does this mean we might one day see Captain Bucky? Probably not anytime soon, given how the movie ends.

This Shot!

Cap vs Iron Man — from the comic books.
Cap vs Iron Man — from the comic books.

We saw this before in the promo material, but seeing it on screen was something else. In a shot taken directly from the cover of Civil War 7, Cap uses his shield to block Iron Man's repulsor blast — albeit without the other heroes lying broken at their feet.

Show Us Your Moves!

Another one from the big final battle — there's a moment where the tide turns against Cap, as Tony has his Iron Man suit scan Steve's moments before and uses the data to match him in combat.

This alludes to a moment from the battle of Civil War 3, where Tony reveals that his Iron Man armor has been collating a database of Cap's fighting techniques, to the point where he can easily best Steve in a fight, beating him nearly to death.

Spider Signal

One of the two post-credits scenes features everyone's new favorite, Tom Holland's Peter Parker, as he recovers from the Leipzig battle and tells May Parker about the big kid from Brooklyn.

While fiddling with his web-shooters — presumably after having them upgraded by Tony Stark — a bright, Bat-signal-like beam shoots out, plastering Spidey's face across the ceiling.

The Spider signal in action.
The Spider signal in action.

This is the Spider signal, a light typically emitted from Spider-Man's belt to use as a light source and to blind and distract criminals while announcing his presence. It's also been shown to have a UV light setting, allowing Spider-Man to investigate crime scenes.

What was your favorite Easter Egg from Captain America: Civil War? Tell us in the comments below!

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